ADRA

(redirected from Administrative Dispute Resolution Act)
AcronymDefinition
ADRAAdventist Development and Relief Agency
ADRAAdministrative Dispute Resolution Act
ADRAAgencia Adventista para el Desarrollo y Recursos Asistenciales (Peru)
ADRAAlternative Dispute Resolution Act
ADRAAdministrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1990
ADRAAustralian Drivers Rights Association (est. 1998)
ADRAAgence Adventiste d'Aide et de Développement (French)
ADRAAddictive Disorders Regulatory Authority
ADRAAnimal Diseases Research Association (United Kingdom)
ADRAAmerican Dream Restoration Act
ADRAAgencia de Desarollo y Recursos Asistenciales de la Iglesia Adventista de Guatemala (Agency of Development and Welfare Resources of the Adventist Church of Guatemala)
References in periodicals archive ?
* ADRA--The Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1996 (ADRA) (7) provides an express privilege from disclosure of mediation communications when a federal agency is a party.
Since the enactment of the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act in 1990, the IRS has been increasingly eager to settle disputes through alternative means such as arbitration and mediation.
The Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1996 provides confidentiality protection for ESGR's USERRA cases during and after mediation.
[subsection] 561 et seq.) and Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1996 ("ADRA," 5 U.S.C.
The EPA center was established under the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1996, which requires each federal agency to have a dispute resolution specialist on staff and to develop an ADR policy.
The Administrative Dispute Resolution Act (ADRA), (16) the legal basis for ADR in the federal government, has been in operation for a relatively short period of time.
Thanks to a series of executive orders since 1995, and the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1996, agencies have faced a series of mandates designed to increase the use of ADR, including:
471 et seq.), the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-552), and the Negotiated Rulemaking Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-648) explicitly expressed support, outlined methods, or stated requirements for federal agencies and departments to implement alternative strategies to resolve their administrative disputes (Madigan, 1992; Susskind, Babbit, and Segal, 1993; Manring, 1994; Deavel, 1994).[1] These acts are Congressional responses to the incredible growth in costs of civil litigation and delays that contribute to those costs.[2] They send out a strong message that conflict resolution is an indispensable component of contemporary public administration and that it is time the field started paying serious attention to it.
We remain open to considering even more approaches to settle cases, which is consistent not only with the basic Appeals mission but with the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1990, which encourages federal agencies to consider dispute resolution techniques.
15, 1990, when President Bush signed the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act, every federal agency must adopt an ADR policy.
In 1996, Congress passed the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1996 (ADRA) authorizing agencies to employ ADR when both parties consent.
Since passage of the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act in 1990, all government agencies have been directed to make broader use of ADR.
Full browser ?