ASIC

(redirected from Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics)
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ASICApplication-Specific Integrated Circuit
ASICAustralian Securities and Investments Commission
ASICAdvocates for Survivors of Child (Australia)
ASICAcid-Sensing Ion Channel (proteins)
ASICAll-In Sustaining Costs (gold mining)
ASICApplication Specific Integrated Circuit
ASICAustralian Seafood Industry Council
ASICAviation Security Identification Card
ASICAmerican Society of Irrigation Consultants
ASICAssociation Scientifique Internationale du Café
ASICAdvanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (US NASA)
ASICAir and Space Interoperability Council (US DoD)
ASICAsociación Salvadoreña de la Industria de la Confección (Spanish: Salvadoran Assembly Industry Association)
ASICAll Source Intelligence Center
ASICAttaché des Systèmes d'Information et de Communication (French: Ancillary Information Systems and Communication)
ASICAll-Source Information Center
ASICArea Security Information Center
ASICAvionics Subsystem Interface Contractor
ASICAutomatic Sprinkler Inspection Company
ASICAfghanistan Standard Industrial Classification
ASICAssociation Suisse des Ingénieurs-Conseils (French: Swiss Association of Consulting Engineers; Switzerland)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Armed with the new, precise distance measurement, scientists using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics, and visible-light observations made over more than two decades, calculated that the black hole in Cygnus X-1 is nearly 15 times more massive than our Sun and is spinning more than 800 times per second.
Using X-ray data from Chandra, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics, the team was able to determine the spin of Cygnus X-1 with unprecedented accuracy, showing that the black hole is spinning at very close to its maximum rate.
NASA said a team of astrophysicists led by Paul Nandra of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center observed the phenomenon in April 1998 in NGC3516, a galaxy 100 million light years away from Earth, using the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA).
satellite ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics).
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