ATBF

(redirected from African Tick-Bite Fever)
Also found in: Medical.
AcronymDefinition
ATBFAdipose Tissue Blood Flow
ATBFAfrican Tick-Bite Fever
ATBFAustralasian Tissue Banking Forum
ATBFAlan T. Brown Foundation to Cure Paralysis (est. 1988; New York, NY)
ATBFAsian Tchoukball Federation
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 2004, Paddock and co-authors investigated a case of tick-bite fever in Virginia associated with multiple eschars that resembled African tick-bite fever. It was misdiagnosed as mite-transmitted rickettsialpox and treated successfully with doxycycline.
* African tick-bite fever is the commonest cause of rickettsial disease in returning travellers.
Cardiac involvement in a patient with clinical and serological evidence of African tick-bite fever. BMC Infect Dis 2005; 5: 90.
African tick-bite fever is a neglected disease that has been mainly detected in tourists who were bitten by a tick while traveling in disease-endemic areas (2).
To the Editor: The first human case of African tick-bite fever was described in 1992 as occurring in Zimbabwe.
This section also includes photographs of physical findings in travelers; the photographs highlight such diseases as African tick-bite fever, chikungunya, dengue, swimmer's itch, African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, measles, tungiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans.
African tick-bite fever. An imported spotless rickettsiosis.
African tick-bite fever (ATBF) is a rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia africae.
Rickettsia africae is the agent of African tick-bite fever, a mild but common disease of local persons and tourists in Africa.
To the Editor: African tick-bite fever (ATBF) is caused by Rickettsia africae and remains the most common tickborne rickettsiosis in sub-Saharan Africa (1,2).
These findings established a diagnosis of acute rickettsiosis, most likely African tick-bite fever. Hemagglutination inhibition testing of the serum samples also detected antibodies to chikungunya virus (47%) and flaviviruses (47%).
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