AREDS

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AcronymDefinition
AREDSAge-Related Eye Disease Study
AREDSAuckland Regional Economic Development Strategy (New Zealand)
AREDSAssociation of Rural Education and Development Service (India)
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration after cataract surgery in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study: AREDS report 25.
[4] Age-Related Eye Disease Study Research Group, "A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of high-dose supplementation with vitamins C and E and beta carotene for age-related cataract and vision loss: AREDS report no.
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), conducted by the National Institutes of Health's National Eye Institute, examined the effects of a "cocktail" of carotenoids and other vitamins and minerals linked to eye health (see "The Best Eye Health Supplements") on the risk of cataracts and advanced AMD.
Chew leads the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), which was designed to investigate a combination of nutritional supplements for slowing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of vision loss among older Americans.
In 2013, the second Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS2) reported that a supplement could slow macular degeneration, the most common cause of blindness in older people.
[17.] Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Research Group Lutein+zeaxanthin and omega-3 fatty acids for age-related macular degeneration: the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) randomized clinical trial.
The 2001 Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), for example, found that supplementation with zinc and antioxidants slightly reduced the risk of developing AMD.
The risk of developing advanced ARMD lesions on the other eye of patients who had already such lesions in one eye was determined at 43% in age-related eye disease study (AREDS) [6].
The latest findings from the National Eye Institute's second age-related eye disease study (AREDS2) also report that 2 mg of zeaxanthin, along with 10 mg of FloraGLO lutein, can slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration.
The 2001 Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), for example, found that supplementation with zinc and antioxidants (including vitamins C and E, as well as beta-carotene) slightly reduced the risk of developing dry AMID in people at high risk for the disease, although there was no demonstrable benefit for patients at lower risk.
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), sponsored by the National Eye Institute, followed 3,640 participants who had at least early AMD for at least five years.
"Oral supplementation with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation (antioxidant vitamins C, E, and beta carotene and zinc) has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD.