ABOF

(redirected from Alaska Board of Fisheries)
AcronymDefinition
ABOFAlaska Board of Fisheries
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, the pinnacles quickly became a primary fishing ground for the charter boat and sport fleet, and in 1998, the Alaska Board of Fisheries permanently closed the pinnacle area to all state managed fisheries at the request of the local Fish and Game Advisory Committee.
In 1995, the Alaska Board of Fisheries prohibited bottom trawling in state waters of Cook Inlet.
The Alaska Board of Fisheries has closed extensive areas in state waters to trawling, including areas closed in conjunction with the Federal trawl closures in Kodiak, Bristol Bay, and Cook Inlet described above.
In the Bering Sea, in addition to the nearshore Bristol Bay trawl closure described previously, the Alaska Board of Fisheries closed all the major embayments west of Unimak Pass to Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands to trawling.
A report to the Alaska Board of Fisheries. Regional Information Report 3A97-43.
1997 Norton Sound District salmon report to the Alaska Board of Fisheries. Regional Information Report 3A97-39.
Report to the Alaska Board of Fisheries, Kuskokwim area, 1997.
The most controversial of these bills is probably SB 113, a bill that would give more authority to the Alaska Board of Fisheries and the Commercial Fisheries Entry Commission to consider state waters "dedicated access privilege programs." It was clear from a teleconference hearing before House Fisheries in May that many Alaska fishing families are concerned about the "intended or unintended" consequences of DAPPs while others favored giving the board the ability to craft them with the full understanding that all DAPP proposals would go through a strenuous public review process.
Although it has never been designated a DAPP, a possible example is the Chignik Salmon Cooperative, which has been on a roller coaster ever since being passed by the Alaska Board of Fisheries three years ago.
The Sitka LAMP was the first, says Diana Cote, the executive director of the Alaska Board of Fisheries, but interest in other local area management plans has been expressed far up the Alaska coast.
"(Groups like) the Alaska Board of Fisheries and the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council deal with huge fish stocks and this is a way of dealing with a local issue," Cote says.
Though most of the plans are expected to involve halibut, or other federally controlled species, the Alaska Board of Fisheries is the lead agency.
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