APWRA

(redirected from Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area)
AcronymDefinition
APWRAAltamont Pass Wind Resource Area (California)
APWRAAmerican Personal Watercraft Rental Association
References in periodicals archive ?
Roughly over a quarter of the golden eagles killed at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area in Northern California from 2012-2014 were recent immigrants to the local population, according to research led by the U.
The results of our work here show golden eagle populations of the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area are sustained by immigration from elsewhere in North America, said Todd Katzner, USGS wildlife biologist and lead author of a new article describing the study published in the journal Conservation Biology.
A team of scientists collected age, genetic and stable isotope information from 67 eagles killed at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area from 2012-2014.
During July 2013, eagle 2 was live-trapped in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area near Livermore, California.
The density of golden eagles near the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area is notably high (12), and this outbreak might reflect habitat changes bringing individuals into closer contact or increasing stress.
A pilot golden eagle population study in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California.
Eagles appear to have declined around the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) since the wind farms have been in place, according to a 1990s study by Grainger Hunt, an ecologist with the Predatory Bird Research Group of the University of California at Santa Cruz.
The Center for Biological Diversity says that wind turbines at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) in California, which is located on a major bird migratory route with high raptor density, "kill more birds of prey than any other wind facility in North America.
According to the organisation, The Center for Biological Diversity, the 5,400 wind turbines owned and operated by FPL Group and NEG Micon in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area in the San Francisco Bay Area are responsible for the death of hundreds of protected birds each year.