AIV

(redirected from Aluminum-Intensive Vehicle)
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AcronymDefinition
AIVAmazon Instant Video
AIVAvian Influenza Virus
AIVAssembly Integration and Verification
AIVAluminium Intensive Vehicle
AIVAluminum-Intensive Vehicle
AIVAggregate Impact Value (engineering)
AIVAnnée Internationale des Volontaires (French)
AIVAverage Impact Value (transportation science)
AIVAfrique in Visu (photography)
AIVAssembly-Integration-Verification
AIVAssociazione Italiana del Vuoto (Italian Vacuum Association)
AIVAdministrator Intervention against Vandalism (Wikimedia Foundation editing policy)
AIVAlternative Inter VLC
AIVApproches Interdisciplinaires du Vivant (French: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Life)
AIVArmored Infantry Vehicle
AIVAcoustic Induced Vibration
AIVAviation Impact Variable
AIVAlternative Investment Vehicle
AIVAssociation de l'Ingénierie du Vent (French: Association of Wind Engineering)
AIVArchitecten-en Ingenieursbureau Vanacker (Dutch: Architects and Engineers Vanacker; Belgium)
AIVAvionics Integrated Verification
AIVAccelerated Inverse Voltage
AIVAccumulated Investment Value
AIVAssociazione Italiana di Vulcanologia (Italian Association of Volcanology)
AIVApplication Industrielle du Vide (French: Industrial Vacuum Application)
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References in periodicals archive ?
B.) The XJ8 is an aluminum-intensive vehicle that is apparently the Forerunner for things that Jaguar will be doing as time goes on, such as in producing the XK replacement (the X150).
There is a lot of aluminum in the new 5 Series, but it doesn't fit the standard definition of an aluminum-intensive vehicle. That's because most of the unibody is made of steel.
Manufacturers have had to develop new joining and assembly methods to meet the demand for aluminum-intensive vehicles (AIVs).
I believe that there will be new aluminum-intensive vehicles in the future, but for now, most interest is focused on aluminum in combination with other materials.
(And one of the things that are rarely mentioned vis-a-vis Tesla is that the Model S and the Model X are aluminum-intensive vehicles and the Model 3 features an aluminum and steel combo.)
The 2000 model year brings even more feathers in the industry's cap: the introduction of aluminum-intensive vehicles from BMW (Z8 roadster), Honda (the S2000 roadster and Insight hybrid vehicle) and Mercedes-Benz (the full-size CL coupe).
The jousting began when the steel industry hired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Materials Science Lab to research an aluminum industry contention: that on a product life-cycle basis, aluminum-intensive vehicles and their manufacture produce less [CO.sub.2] than their steel counterparts.
As for the Audi lunar quattro, they're using their know-how in all-wheel drive, lightweight construction (remember that Audi was one of the first companies to develop the technologies required for producing aluminum-intensive vehicles and have since refined that with multi-materials expertise) and electric and plug-in hybrid motors.
But Todd Summe, Global Technology Director, Automotive, Novelis, points out that the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport models, which are aluminum-intensive vehicles, have a production volume of some 150,000 units per year.
From pushing aluminum-intensive vehicles to retrenching toward parts and pieces, the aluminum industry has had difficulty laying out, much less following, a coherent roadmap.
When Lotus first introduced the method on the low-volume Elise in 1996, company leaders were worried about market acceptance for what is essentially a glued-together car, but the technique proved so successful (over 23,000 cars produced with no reported failures) that it has become the basis of a new higher volume venture that may help to bring aluminum-intensive vehicles more into the mainstream.