AAKC

(redirected from Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay)
AcronymDefinition
AAKCApartment Association of Kansas City (Shawnee Mission, KS)
AAKCAmazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (Michael Chabon book)
AAKCAll American Kit Cutters
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the conclusions are unsettling: Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay is understood as a novel that threatens to generalize the Holocaust so much that it endorses a sense of anonymity amongst "Europe's murdered Jews." Other novels, including Krauss's Great House and Orringer's The Invisible Bridge, are understood as providing a roadmap that is both theoretical and real, one marked by artifacts and stories, one that helps readers navigate the transmission of postmemory through literary representation.
He appears in fantasy writer Terry Pratchett's Discworld series, and Michael Chabon's great American novel of a book The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. In Cynthia Ozick's The Puttermesser Papers the golem is a woman who helps her creator become mayor of New York.
The august gatekeepers might tolerate the humour in Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, but Toni Morrison's Beloved is closer to their solemn hearts.
This essay argues that in evoking and imagining vivid representations of Jewish bodily difference, Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and Philip Roth's The Plot Against America produce subjects whose distanced, critical relation to U.S.
--MICHAEL CHABON, author of six novels, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, in MeSweeney's (Issue 36)
Michael Chabon - The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay" talks about his first major work of nonfiction, the autobiographical narrative "Manhood for Amateurs," 7:30 p.m., Powell's City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W.
Novels that capture the experience of young comic book readers, like Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay or Jonathan Lethem's The Fortress of Solitude, demonstrate the desire for escape or transformation that Atlas so successfully tapped into.
The story of the Jewish origin of the comic book has been told in bits and pieces, most notably in Michael Chabon's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (2000).
But in many ways, the books that were most important in helping me figure out my relationship to this research and by extension, the novel's relationship to this research were two novels: The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon (Random House, September 2000) and Ragtime by E.L.
But if this is Maliszewski's concern, why not tackle Chabon's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, rather than the unpublished text of a performance?
Chabon is the noted author of several novels including Wonder Boys, which was made into successful film starring Michael Douglas and Tobey Maguire, and the Pulitzer Prize winning The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. In this latter book, set at the outset of World War II, Chabon has his two young protagonists, Joe Kavalier and Sammy Clay, create an exciting character and comic book named The Escapist, which quickly becomes a publishing sensation.
But Chabon -whose previous works include the comic book The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and Wonder Boys, which inspired theMichael Douglas film -does not try to produce the same sense of historical myth as Tolkein's work.