ASV

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AcronymDefinition
ASVAmerican Standard Version
ASVAmerikas Savienoto Valstu (Latvian: United States of America)
ASVAdvanced Super View (Sharp LCD display)
ASVAdaptive Servo-Ventilation (therapy)
ASVActive Service
ASVAdvanced Super View
ASVApplication Server
ASVAdobe Svg Viewer
ASVApproved Scanning Vendor
ASVAnti-Surface Vessel
ASVArmored Security Vehicle
ASVAdobe SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) Viewer
ASVArchivio Segreto Vaticano (Italian: Vatican Secret Archive)
ASVAdvanced Safety Vehicle
ASVAnodic Stripping Voltammetry
ASVAllgemeiner Sportverein (German Sports Association)
ASVAmboseli, Kenya (airport code)
ASVAir Surveillance (radar)
ASVAxel Springer Verlag (German publishing company)
ASVAnnual Subscription Value (FactSet)
ASVAge Sexe Ville (French: Age, Sex, City)
ASVAmerican Society for Virology
ASVAuxiliaire Spécialisée Vétérinaire (French: Specialized Veterinary Assistant)
ASVAir-To-Surface Vessel
ASVAvian Sarcoma Virus
ASVAllocation Spéciale Vieillesse (French: Special Old-Age Allowance; pension scheme)
ASVAutomatic Speaker Verification
ASVAutomatic Signature Verification
ASVAir Switching Valve
ASVAssociation Sportive Villefontaine (French: Villefontaine Sports Association; Villefontaine, France)
ASVAll-Surface Vehicle
ASVAll Season Vehicle
ASVAlkali Spreading Value
ASVAdaptive Supply Voltage
ASVAutogenous Saphenous Vein
ASVAverage System Value
ASVAutomatic Self-Verification
ASVAnnular Safety Valve (oil field technology)
ASVApplication-Specific Vulnerability
ASVAccommodation and Support Vessel (ship)
ASVAustralian Sheep Veterinarians (Australian Veterinary Association)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Girls stand near a cow outside their home in October 2015 in Amboseli, Kenya. A new study shows that girls whose families vaccinate their livestock are more likely to go to school.
In their sample of a real-life group of 1,360 elephants in Amboseli, Kenya, their analysis suggests that about 220 to 330 pounds of ivory can be taken sustainably each year.
Princeton University researchers studied 125 male baboons in Amboseli, Kenya for a nine-year period.