AJGP

(redirected from American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
AcronymDefinition
AJGPAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
AJGPAshkenazi Jewish Genetic Panel (blood test)
AJGPAmerican Journal of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy
AJGPAdvanced Java Game Programming
References in periodicals archive ?
This study is part of a special issue of The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry that captures an important moment in the evolving relationship between technology and the clinical care of older adults.
2004, Aggression in suicide among adults age 50 and over, American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 12, 37-42.
One might think that with all the negative experiences in the lives of these individuals, events that happened fifty years ago would not drive mental health outcomes, but they do," said UCSFs Margot Kushel, MD, professor of medicine and senior author on the study, published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry on Aug.
The current study, published online April 12 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, included 100 people, ages 80 to 99, with varying degrees of hearing loss.
A large study published in the July 30, 2015 American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry suggests that participants who reported problem drinking in middle age are more than twice as likely as those who did not report a history of problem drinking to suffer from severe memory impairment in later life.
The study appeared in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
9 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, researchers found that people who received cognitive rehabilitation felt their performance of daily activities improved.
Well, searching the Internet may be just as effective at keeping your brain sharp, according to a study published in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
A UCLA study published in 2006 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry found that people may be able to improve their cognitive function and brain efficiency by making simple lifestyle changes such as incorporating memory exercises, healthy eating, physical fitness, and stress reduction.
The researchers found that subjects who had reported that they rarely moved outside their homes were significantly more likely to develop AD, mild cognitive impairment and cognitive decline than participants who got around most, according to a report published April 15, 2011 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
Jeste, MD, Distinguished Professor of psychiatry and neurosciences at UCSD School of Medicine, Estelle and Edgar Levi Chair in Aging, and director of the UC San Diego Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, appears in the March issue of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
In April 2008, the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published a study of 1,586 people aged 50 and older for up to 26 years, testing the levels of depression and cognitive functioning from time to time.
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