AJTM

(redirected from American Journal of Tropical Medicine)
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AJTMAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine
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References in periodicals archive ?
Argaw et al., "Risk factors for visceral leishmaniasis in a new epidemic site in Amhara region, Ethiopia," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Dayan, "The history of dengue outbreaks in the Americas," American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Kinoti, "Metrifonate or praziquantel treatment improves physical fitness and appetite of Kenyan schoolboys with Schistosoma haematobium and hookworm infections," American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Nzovu et al., "Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of Anopheles mosquitoes and Plasmodium falciparum transmission along the Kenyan coast," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Wahlgren, "Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte rosetting is mediated by promiscuous lectin-like interactions," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Lima et al., "Successful treatment of refractory mucosal leishmaniasis with pentoxifylline plus antimony," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Nicodemo, "Lung lesions in human leptospirosis: microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features related to thrombocytopenia," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Morakote, "Fluctuations of larval excretion in Strongyloides stercoralis infection," American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Akhtar, "Recurrent Streptococcus bovis meningitis in Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection after kidney transplantation the dilemma in anon-endemic area," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Beyond the harm they do to the patients who use them, these so-called "falsified medicines" as dubbed by a recent special journal supplement by The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, undermine trust of the health system and carry an economic toll as well.
But articles in a special issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, published online last month, show that efforts to control this problem have had only modest success over the past decade.
Since the West Nile virus was first detected in New York in 1999, hospitali7ed patients in the United States have cost an estimated $778.1 million in health care expenditures and lost productivity, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
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