ACOA

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Related to Anterior communicating artery: Posterior communicating artery
AcronymDefinition
ACOAAdult Children Of Alcoholics
ACOAAtlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
ACOAAmerican Committee on Africa
ACOAAnterior Communicating Artery
ACOAArizona Center on Aging
ACOAAssociation Canadienne des Orthophonistes et Audiologistes (Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists)
ACOAAdaptive Course Of Action
ACOAAustralian Council for Overseas Aid (Australia)
ACOAAlternative Course of Action
ACOAAlternate Course Of Action
ACOAActivity Center for Older Adults
References in periodicals archive ?
(6.) Esra Gurdal, Ozgur Cackmak, Mine Yalcinkaya, et al.: "Two variations of the anterior communicating artery a clinical reminder" Neuro-anatomy (2004) volume 3, Pages 32, 34.
(2) Anterior communicating artery. (b1) Rupture site with magnification (b2).
Suzuki, "Anterior communicating artery aneurysms with associated anomalies," Journal of Neurosurgery, vol.
of California, San Francisco) details the basic concepts and tenets of aneurysm microsurgery, various craniotomies and exposures for successful clipping, and microsurgical anatomy, dissection strategies, and clipping techniques for each of the seven most common aneurysm types: posterior and anterior communicating artery, middle cerebral artery, ophthalmic artery, basilar bifurcation, pericallosal artery, and posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.
n % Supraclinoid ICA 7 10.3 ACA 1 1.5 ACOM 25 36.8 MCA 4 5.9 Paraclinoid ICA 2 2.9 PICA 2 2.9 PCOM 12 17.6 PCA 2 2.9 Vertebral 2 2.9 Basilar 10 14.7 Superior cerebellar 1 1.5 Total 68 100.0 ICA = internal carotid artery; ACA=anterior cerebral artery; ACOM = anterior communicating artery; MCA = middle cerebral artery; PICA=posterior inferior cerebellar artery; PCOM = posterior communicating artery; PCA = posterior communicating artery Table 2.
The primary routes of collateral circulation are the Willisian channels (anterior communicating artery, posterior communicating artery, and the ophthalmic via the external carotid artery).
The patient presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. He underwent surgical clipping and developed cerebral ischemia due to vasospasm.
When location was examined as a risk factor, only aneurysms in the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) and posterior communicating artery (PCoA) were significantly more likely to be found among patients with ruptured aneurysms.
Left anterior and middle cerebral arterial flow was maintained through the anterior communicating artery. The vertebral arteries and the right internal and external carotid arteries were patent and normal.
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