ATFL

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AcronymDefinition
ATFLAnterior Talofibular Ligament
ATFLAsh-Throated Flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens, bird species)
ATFLAgro Tech Foods Limited (India)
ATFLAmerican Task Force for Lebanon
ATFLAfon Teifi Fairways Ltd. (Wales, UK)
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References in periodicals archive ?
UC Berkeley researchers found that the Ash-throated Flycatcher, a low-elevation species, shifted its range downslope in response to climate change.
The ones that shifted their range downslope include both low-elevation species like the Ash-throated Flycatcher and Western Scrub-Jay, and high-elevation species like the Cassin's Finch and Red-breasted Nuthatch.
With a visit to the Nina Mason Pulliam Rio Salado Audubon Center, you'll finally know your ash-throated flycatcher from your double-crested cormorant.
The Ash-throated Flycatcher Myiarchus cinerascens, the Blue-throated Hummingbird Lampornis clemenciae, the Northern-beardless Tyrannulet Camptostoma imberbe and the Black-chinned Hummingbird Archilocus alexandri were also forest birds but equally common in Ipomoea/small-leaved tree forests and other Acacia forests.
Finally, the Ash-throated Flycatcher was ubiquitous (with a certain preference for Acacia forests in autumn) and the Rufous-crowned Sparrow had an unpredictable distribution in the four seasons.
we included the ash-throated flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens), western kingbird (Tyrannus verticalis), warbling vireo (Vireo gilvus), Lucy's warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), western tanager (Piranga ludoviciana), chipping sparrow (Spizella passerina), lark sparrow (Chondestes grammacus), lark bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys), black-headed grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus), lazuli bunting (Passerina amoena), Bullock's oriole (Icterus bullockii), and lesser goldfinch (Carduelis psaltria).
Although we either captured or observed molting adults for all 12 species, we were unable to obtain molting rates during observational surveys, and molting rates of adults at the mistnetting stations were <30% for 3 of the 10 species; ash-throated flycatcher, warbling vireo, and black-headed grosbeak (Pyle et al., 2009).
Habitats selected at a significantly higher rate than at least one other habitat included grasslands by five species (western kingbirds, chipping and lark sparrows, and lark and lazuli buntings), willow riparian by four species (Lucy's warblers, lark and lazuli buntings, and lesser goldfinches), mesquite by four species (ash-throated flycatchers, Lucy's warblers, lark sparrows, and lazuli buntings), cottonwood riparian by three species (Lucy's warblers, lazuli buntings, and lesser goldfinches), oak by two species (chipping sparrows and black-headed grosbeaks), and desert scrub by one species (lazuli buntings).