ATWAM

(redirected from Attitudes Toward Women as Managers)
AcronymDefinition
ATWAMAttitudes Toward Women as Managers (gender research)
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Our hypothesis is that the graduating students will have more positive attitudes toward women as managers than those students at the beginning stages of their business education.
However, it has also been used to investigate differences in attitudes toward women as managers across various nations including professionals in Nigeria (Adeyemi-Bello & Tomkiewicz, 1997) and Chile (Cordano, Scherer, & Owen, 2002).
Scores ranged from 71 to 147 for Strategic Management (graduating) students and 84 to 139 for the Organizational Management (introductory) course amongst our respondents, with the highest scores indicating more favorable attitudes toward women as managers.
For example, Dubno (1985) found that male MBA students retained significantly negative attitudes toward women as managers.
Owen and Todor (1993) surveyed both human resource professionals and undergraduate students, and found that for both groups' attitudes toward women as managers were more positive for women than men.
1974), a scale developed to measure general attitudes toward women as managers.
Just as attitudes toward women as managers sometimes limit the success of female managers in U.
Caligiuri and Cascio (1998) further suggested that predeparture training for female managers should include accurate information about host country attitudes toward women as managers.
To extend previous research, we posed the following question: What are the attitudes toward women as managers held by Latin American nationals?
In an effort to find out, we conducted a study based on measuring attitudes toward women as managers among two groups: human resources (HR) professionals and undergraduate business students.
Each group contained both men and women, allowing a comparison of male and female attitudes toward women as managers.
001 level, indicating that the HR professionals' attitudes toward women as managers were significantly more positive than the attitudes of the students.
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