BLaIN


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
BLaINBaltic Language and Integration Network (UK)
References in periodicals archive ?
Today's Blain's Farm & Fleet is generally located in suburban fringe communities where they can serve hobby farmers (beekeepers and those with horses and chickens, primarily) as well as suburban homeowners.
Blain said she didn't know much about the agency, but had been working with ABLE staff members during an investigation into a parole case.
Once her interest was sparked, Blain says, "I wanted to understand more about ways in which Black women were critical to the movement--the kinds of things they did and the ways in which they were able to advance the cause of Black liberation."
The Irish Embassy in Dubai is liaising with Mr Blain's family and are making arrangements to have his remains flown home.
On set, it was humbling for Blain to see the work ethic that went into becoming a successful actor.
Based on this assumption, Blain (2011) evaluated the presence of temporal persistence, periodic components, and trends in the 10-day rainfall totals (PRE), obtained from the weather station of Campinas (1890-2009; State of Sao Paulo).
TEHRAN (FNA)- President of the Organization International des Constructeurs d'Automobiles Patric Blain met with Head of Iran's leading carmaker, the Iran-Khodro Company (IKCO).
WORCESTER - Roland Joseph Blain, 91, of Worcester, formerly of Grosvenordale, CT, passed away peacefully on Sunday, August 18, 2013 at home surrounded by his loving family.
CRICKET: West of Scotland have signed former Saltires all-rounder John Blain, 33, as player-coach.
A possivel influencia das chamadas ilhas de calor urbano nas series meteorologicas do Estado de Sao Paulo tambem e indicada por Blain et al.
THE New Saints boss Mike Davies rued missed chances and sloppy defending as Dylan Blain's last-gasp strike sent his side to a 2-1 defeat at Port Talbot.
Dr Emma Blain, a research fellow at the university's school of biosciences, who is leading the study, said: "The south-west of England and Wales has a long-standing connection with the Somali community, who have used extracts of frankincense as a traditional herbal remedy for arthritic conditions.