BIDR

(redirected from Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding)
AcronymDefinition
BIDRBlaustein Institutes for Desert Research (Ben-Gurion University; Israel)
BIDRBalanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (psychology)
BIDRBasic Interoperability Data Requirements
BIDRBasal Posthepatic Insulin Delivery Rate
References in periodicals archive ?
The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR; Paulhus, 1984) measures these aspects of response bias separately.
Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (Paulhus, 1984)--The BIDR is a 40-item self-report measure where items are rated from 0 (not true) to 6 (very true).
One of these measures, the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) version 6-Form 40A (Palhus, 1984), requires more detailed explanation.
The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) was assessed across the three conditions in order to determine whether supervision and medium of survey presentation would affect levels of socially desirable responding.
Paulhus (1984) developed a 40-item reliable and valid self-report measure called the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding that extended Sackheim and Gur's notions of self-deception by assessing two independent dimensions of social desirability, self-deceptive enhancement and impression management.
Participants in Sample 2 completed Paulus' (1984) Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding, a 40-item measure of two types of biases reflecting social desirable responding rated on a 7-point Likert scale (1 = not true to 7 = very true).
Chapter six presents four scales that have been used to assess individual differences in impression management styles: the self-monitoring scale, the balanced inventory of desirable responding (BIDR), the self-presentation scale and the measure of ingratiatory behaviours in organizational settings (MIBOS).
The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) is a 40-item scale that measures both impression management and self-deception by asking questions which vary in terms of representing overt behaviour (impression management item) or psychologically threatening thoughts or feelings (self-deception).
In addition, the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR), developed by Paulhus (1989), was used to assess both impression management and self-deception.
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