BEARN


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AcronymDefinition
BEARNBangladesh Education and Resource Network
References in periodicals archive ?
One may doubt whether the campaign of Jeanne's captain Montgomery and his army of the Viscounts to recover Bearn in the second half of 1569 was really inspired by Judges 11.18 (going round "the land of Moab," i.e., lower Guyenne, 229), but the account of this episode is masterly.
The mythical Bearn, which gives title to his best-known novel, names a place, a family, and a way of life.
Born at Pau in Bearn (December 14, 1553), the son of Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Vendome, and Jeanne d'Albret; called the Prince of Bearn until his mother's death; educated as a Catholic in Paris (1561-1564), he was raised a Protestant after he rejoined his mother (1564); served under Gaspard de Coligny during the Third Huguenot War (1568-1570); distinguished himself at Arnay-le-Duc in Burgundy (May?
The regression results for the model predicting black family earnings in the SMSA (BEARN) are:
The Conditions Race for novice riders went to the odds-on Sir Du Bearn, which gave Regan Pallas, 18, from Narberth, his first winner.
'S e a' cheist de lionas am bearn? Bi impidh air a' BHBC barrachd a dheanamh le nas lugha airgead iad fhein.
stratford, saturday soft, good to soft in places SIR DU BEARN belied his 25-1 odds with a resounding success in the 2m5f110yds handicap chase.
Vernier (emeritus, Wayne State U.), who wrote The flower of chivalry; Bertrand du Guesclin and the Hundred years war, presents a page- turner that recounts the life and exploits of the dastardly Count of Foix, who ruled in Bearn, on the border of Spain, at the time of the Hundred Years War, the war against the Cathars, and the Investiture Controversy, all of which affected the Count in greater or lesser ways.
Born on November 12, 1912, Lasserre left his native Bearn region in France's Basque country aged 12, and worked his way up through Paris' restaurants before opening his own in 1942, near the Champs Elysees.
My personal favorite is the remarkable contrast provided by two histories of Calvinism in rural regions: Mark Greengrass's study of its failure to set down deep roots in Jeanne d'Albret's sovereign principality of Bearn (119-42), and Jane Dawson's argument for its implausible early successes in the Scottish Highlands (231-53).
After having falls from the fancied Tomoraz Man and January Don - not to mention finishing runner-up to Sir Du Bearn in the men's open race at the recent Llangeinor Hunt Point-To-Point Steeplechases - Carmarthen's Ben Jones could be forgiven for feeling sorry for himself.
Easy for Sir Du Bearn Paul Nicholls' Sir Du Bearn had the look of a good thing in a weak beginners' chase and the only surprise when he came home 30 lengths clear was his generous starting price of 4-5.