BELLS


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AcronymDefinition
BELLSBarcelona English Language and Literature Studies (journal; University of Barcelona; Spain)
References in classic literature ?
A pæan from the bells! And his merry bosom swells With the pæan of the bells!
What he loved above all else in the maternal edifice, that which aroused his soul, and made it open its poor wings, which it kept so miserably folded in its cavern, that which sometimes rendered him even happy, was the bells. He loved them, fondled them, talked to them, understood them.
But Thistledown was too sad for that, and when he told them all his story they no longer urged, but sought to comfort him; and one whom they called little Sparkle (for her crown and robe shone with the brightest diamonds), said: "You will have to work for us, ere you can win a gift to show the Brownies; do you see those golden bells that make such music, as we wave them to and fro?
Nicholas bell is a good deal the worst one that has been contrived yet, and is peculiarly maddening in its operation.
At the moment when the bride's foot touched the threshold the bell swung heavily in the tower above her, and sent forth its deepest knell.
The heat and smell below drove them on deck with their plunder, and they found Disko at the bell, which he handed over to Harvey.
I see only a coincidence of occurrences such as happens with all the phenomena of life, and I see that however much and however carefully I observe the hands of the watch, and the valves and wheels of the engine, and the oak, I shall not discover the cause of the bells ringing, the engine moving, or of the winds of spring.
It was the Bell. If the ghastliest shape the human mind has ever pictured in its wildest dreams had risen up before him, he could not have staggered backward from its touch, as he did from the first sound of that loud iron voice.
Bewildered by the host of shifting and extraordinary figures, as well as by the uproar of the Bells, which all this while were ringing, Trotty clung to a wooden pillar for support, and turned his white face here and there, in mute and stunned astonishment.
At seven bells the first gong rang; at eight there was breakfast, for such as were not too seasick to eat it.
His name, now known as widely as the telephone itself, was Alexander Graham Bell. He was a teacher of acoustics and a student of electricity, possibly the only man in his generation who was able to focus a knowledge of both subjects upon the problem of the telephone.
People said "The Evening Bell is sounding, the sun is setting." For a strange wondrous tone was heard in the narrow streets of a large town.