BPC

(redirected from Bits per Character)
AcronymDefinition
BPCBusiness Plan Competition (various schools)
BPCBrewton-Parker College (Mt Vernon, GA)
BPCBlack Powder Coat (product color)
BPCBackbase Presentation Client
BPCBorland Pascal Compiler
BPCBasic Peripheral Channel
BPCBroadcast Performance Control
BPCBits per Component
BPCBusiness Plan Chart
BPCBasic Personal Computer
BPCBits per Character
BPCBipartisan Policy Center (Washington, DC)
BPCBroadening Participation in Computing (US NSF)
BPCBible Presbyterian Church
BPCBournemouth and Poole College (UK)
BPCBusiness Planning and Consolidation
BPCBâtiment de Projection et de Commandement (French: Vessel Projection and Command)
BPCBritish Potato Council
BPCBorder Protection Command (Australia)
BPCBangladesh Petroleum Corporation (Chittagong, Bangladesh)
BPCBrentwood Presbyterian Church (Los Angeles, CA)
BPCBrown Printing Company
BPCBritish Pharmaceutical Codex
BPCBerklee Performance Center (Berklee College of Music; Boston, MA)
BPCBangladesh Parjatan Corporation
BPCBonnes Pratiques Cliniques (French: Good Clinical Practices)
BPCBoard of Port Commissioners (California)
BPCBlack People's Convention
BPCBusiness Process Change
BPCBay Path College (Massachusetts)
BPCBrasil para Cristo (Spanish: Brazil for Christ)
BPCBritish Poultry Council (formerly British Poultry Meat Federation)
BPCBeyond Parental Control (various locations)
BPCBiology, Physics, Chemistry (education)
BPCBethel Pentecostal Church (various locations)
BPCBoost Protective Cover
BPCBanque Populaire de Chine (French: People's Bank of China)
BPCBusiness Promotion Centre (various locations)
BPCBissell Pro Cycling (racing team)
BPCBusiness Process Collaboration (computing)
BPCBuilding Partnership Capacity
BPCBulk Pharmaceutical Chemical
BPCBusiness Process Consultancy
BPCBruton Parish Church (Williamsburg, VA)
BPCBayer Pharmaceuticals Corporation
BPCBritish Phosphate Commission
BPCBusiness Plan Challenge (various organizations)
BPCBiovail Pharmaceuticals Canada (pharmaceutical company)
BPCBuilding Professionals Consortium (Canada)
BPCBigPond Cable (Telstra)
BPCBuilding Performance Centre (UK)
BPCBest Practices Clearinghouse
BPCBaghdad Police College (Iraq)
BPCBalboa Park Club (San Diego, CA)
BPCBanque Parisienne de Crédit (France)
BPCBiological Pest Control
BPCBethlehem Peace Center (Palestine)
BPCBasic Predistortion Cell
BPCBeach Photography Club (various locations)
BPCBack Pressure Control
BPCBasic Process Control (industrial description of an interlock)
BPCBad Pool Caller
BPCButylpyridinium Chloride (chemistry)
BPCBusiness Process Council
BPCBattle Projection Center
BPCBulk Power Control
BPCBerserk Postal Clerks (band)
BPCBusiness Plus Corporation
BPCBarrington Psychiatric Center
BPCBataillon Parachutistes Coloniaux (French: Colonial Parachute Battalion)
BPCBlois Poker Club (France)
BPCBordeaux Poker Club (France)
BPCBessel Product Combining
BPCBlock Power Control
BPCBureau de Poste Civil (Canada Post)
BPCBarometric Pressure Control (aviation)
BPCBayesian Predictive Compensation
BPCBusiness Process Choreography/Choreographer
BPCBest Practices China, Ltd. (consulting)
BPCBusiness Prioritization Council
BPCBook & Periodical Council of Canada
BPCBali Promotion Center (Bali, Indonesia)
BPCBooster Preamplifier Card
BPCBi-Phase Coding
BPCBureau de Poste de Campagne (French: post office of the country; Belgian postmark)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to [25], when an end-user generates a password using either lowercase characters only or uppercase characters only, the randomness of the password is estimated to be between 2 and 3 bits per character as against the machine-generated 4.7 bits.
(10) Compressing each English character down to 1.21 with an algorithm called DURILCA is within the theoretical limits proposed by Shannon (1951), between 0.6-1.3 bits per character.
Compressing each English character down to 1.21 with an algorithm called DURILCA, which is within the limits proposed by Claude Shannon (1951) between 0.61.3 bits per character. A 1 [cm.sup.2] low-quality, grayscale newspaper image from 1980 contains 709 bits (compressed by a factor of 6:1), and a 1 [cm.sup.2] normal quality color newspaper image from 2007 contains 1,422 bits (compressed by a factor of 16:1).
Large texts are therefore compressed to around 30% of their input size (2.4 bits per character)--a significant improvement over the 55%-60% (4.4-4.8 bits per character) achieved by zero-order character-based models of English.
With b - f = 6 the compression loss is negligible, and even with b - f = 2 the loss is small--0.23 bits per character, well within the 0.50 average case bound reported above in Table III.
With a 5MB memory limit in which the words and nonwords must be stored, and a shift/add coder using b = 32 and f - 20, it attains a compression ratio for the same 20MB test file of 2.20 bits per character, encodes at 10.8 MB/min., and decodes at 10.0 MB/min.
Although the standard character set required only 7 bits to represent a character, the extended set required 8 bits per character, Thus these new programs could not be transferred between computers on Usenet using the normal methods of distribution.
My example demonstrates compression of 3.8 bits per character from compress for a file approximating English text.