BCPR

(redirected from Black Powder Cartridge Rifle)
AcronymDefinition
BCPRBureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery
BCPRBioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap (NASA)
BCPRBoston Committee for Palestinian Rights
BCPRBoston Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation
BCPRBernalillo County Parks and Recreation (Albuquerque, NM)
BCPRBureau for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (UNDP)
BCPRBlack Powder Cartridge Rifle
BCPRBoard Certified in Public Relations (AAPRMA)
BCPRButler County Public Radio (Pennsylvania)
BCPRBucks County Parks and Recreation (Pennsylvania)
BCPRBaltimore City Passenger Railway (Maryland)
References in periodicals archive ?
In their close-range ammunition, cowboy action shooters often don't use this disk, but long-range, black powder cartridge rifle shooters universally do.
I do seriously compete in NRA Black Powder Cartridge Rifle Silhouette and for those some extra effort goes into bullet preparation and loading.
That match happened to be the trial one put on by the NRA to see if Black Powder Cartridge Rifle Silhouette would be a viable sport.
Then in 1984 and 1985, I was, respectively, invited to my first cowboy-action event and the very first experimental NRA Black Powder Cartridge Rifle (BPCR) Silhouette match.
All of a sudden it dawned on me if I wanted to be a high ranked competitor in the NRAs Black Powder Cartridge Rifle Silhouette (BPCR) game, I needed to focus on one caliber.
My own chosen type of competitive shooting is the NRA's Black Powder Cartridge Rifle (BPCR) Silhouette.
When I'm shooting at a metallic ram silhouette standing well over a quarter mile away during a Black Powder Cartridge Rifle (BPCR) Silhouette event I know with certainty my own homecast projectile is more than good enough to stay on the small speck I'm seeing.
Paper patch bullets are interesting and even fun to assemble because of their history, but the fact remains m modern times no major black powder cartridge rifle competition has been won by them.
Sharps Arms folks are currently working on loading info and ballistic data for the various chamberings offered in their Model 1874 Sharps black powder cartridge rifles. This information is scheduled for publication later this year.
Most anything will work, but since I keep a large quantity of 1-20 tin-to-lead alloy on hand for my black powder cartridge rifles, I also cast my handgun bullets from it.
Montana Armory offers black powder cartridge rifles in the famous Sharps design and a New Model 1885 High Wall with a 28-inch sporting barrel in several calibers including .40-65 Winchester.
When diving into the world of BPCRs (black powder cartridge rifles) in 1981 the obvious pick for a novice would be .45-70.