BWO

(redirected from Blue-Winged Olive)
AcronymDefinition
BWOBodies Without Organs (band)
BWOBooks We Own
BWOBackup while Open
BWOBlue-Winged Olive
BWOBackward Wave Oscillator
BWOBlue World Order (wrestling spoof)
BWOBalakovo (Russia)
BWOBy Way Of
BWOBowels Well Open
BWOBroncos World Order
BWOBetter Watch Out
BWOBlackwater Operations (game)
BWOBlack Water Ops (Bungie.net groups)
BWOBench Warrant Ordered
BWOBattle Watch Officer
BWObladder washout
BWOBlack Women's Organization
References in periodicals archive ?
I headed upstream and eventually went under the Quick Way bridge where I took one seven-inch wild brown and a 14-inch wild brown on #18 blue-winged olive. Above was a long pool where the sun cast a shadow over the pool, making it easier to scout the fish.
That being said, skilled fly-anglers have success fishing blue-winged olive emerger patterns in the Camp Sherman area throughout the winter.
The main event on the Green is the afternoon Blue-winged Olive hatch.
Blue-winged olive hatches also provide the first early-spring action on the main stem Willamette and lower McKenzie.
Blue-winged Olives begin hatching in late March and continue until the Pale Morning Duns begin in late May, then return again in the fall.
In mid-June, they'll be back for another weekend on the Farmington, where sulphurs and blue-winged olives should be hatching abundantly.
On a warm day, a hatch of midges or blue-winged olives might come off, but beadhead nymphs are a better bet.
Also showing in the afternoons are blue-winged olives and these can be imitated with small F-style dun patterns or, later in the day, a spinner fished flat in the surface film.
Some important early-season mayflies include Hendricksons, March Browns, and Blue-winged Olives. Several caddis species are also present.
High above the creek, mayflies that anglers call blue-winged olives and pale morning duns bob up and down in the still air; fluttering down along the banks are sulfur-tinted golden stone flies.
Blue-winged olives should be effective for trout on the McKenzie River.
In Pennsylvania, the First Four begins with the appearance of the Blue-winged Olives (Baetis tricaudatus), which emerge around the middle of March.