Bomb Wg

(redirected from Bombardment Wing)
AcronymDefinition
Bomb WgBombardment Wing
Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fifteenth Air Force assigned the mission of escorting the B-17s of the 5th Bombardment Wing that day to the 332d Fighter Group, the Tuskegee Airmen.
The 5th Bombardment Wing did not launch all six of its bombardment groups of B-17s, as originally planned.
Twenty-one of the 332d Fighter Group's P-51s turned back toward Ramitelli, leaving only thirty-six Tuskegee Airmen to escort the 5th Bombardment Wing. However, at least on the way to the target, the 52d Fighter Group was also escorting the B-17s.
While flying with the 19th Bombardment Wing, he served as the staff judge advocate for the wing, then as assistant JAG for the Twentieth Air Force.
commander of the 303d Armament and Electronics Squadron, deputy chief of operations, 303d Bombardment Wing, and commander 358th Bomb Squadron, all at Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona.
He held numerous command positions in weapon system development and air defense, including Commander of the 22d Bombardment Wing, 44the BW, the 320th BW, and the 12th Air Division,
Two weeks later, on December 21st, 19 of 49 58th Bombardment Wing B-29s, dispatched from Chengdu, attacked an aircraft factory and arsenal at Shenyang; eight B-29s attacked several alternates and targets of opportunity around Mukden.
In December 1947, General Gunderson was assigned to the 28th Strategic Bombardment Wing, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, where he served on a Strategic Air Command lead crew, on the standardization board, and as the wing staff navigator, flying in B-29, B-36, and RB-36 aircraft.
Chief Barnes transferred, in June 1958, to the 42d Bombardment Wing at Loring AFB, Maine, and served as a B-52 crew chief flight chief and senior controller.
The new general then took command of the 17th Bombardment Wing (Light) at Savannah, Georgia, on October 1, 1940, and continued his exceptional performance.
At Third Air Force, Brereton continued the work he had begun with the 17th Bombardment Wing. On September 15, 1941, the largest prewar maneuvers took place in Louisiana and Texas between the Second and Third Armies, comprising between 350,000 and 400,000 men.
They were formed primarily to protect the interests of one group of air crewmen new to the 305th and 43rd Bombardment Wings (Medium), the ECM specialists.