BJOG

(redirected from British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology)
AcronymDefinition
BJOGBritish Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
References in periodicals archive ?
Brosens, "Inadequate maternal vascular response to placentation in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia and by small-for-gestational age infants," The British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
Robertson, "Fetal growth retardation and the arteries of the placental bed," The British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
Aksu, "Correlation between placental bed biopsy findings, vascular cell adhesion molecule and fibronectin levels in pre-eclampsia," The British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
Darling, "Can 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement predict the development of hypertension in primigravidae?" British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
Austgulen, "Risk factors and clinical manifestations of preeclampsia," British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
(58.) Cameron ST et al., Impact of the introduction of new medical methods on therapeutic abortions at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 1996, 103(12): 1222-1229; and Winikoff B, 1995, op.
(59.) Slade P et al., Comparison of medical and surgical termination of pregnancy: choice, emotional impact and satisfaction with care, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 1998, 105(12):1288-1295; and Urquhart DR and Templeton AA, Psychiatric morbidity and acceptability following medical and surgical methods of induced abortion, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 1991, 98(4):396-399.
Clare Stevinson, of the Department of Complementary Medicine at Exeter University, carried out a study on St John's Wort and PMS, which was published in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Van Geijn, "Application of a customised birthweight standard in the assessment of perinatal outcome in a high risk population," British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
But the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology reports today removing only the cervix prevents the disease from spreading and still allows pregnancy.
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