BITRE

(redirected from Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics)
AcronymDefinition
BITREBureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (Australia)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics has found that, on average, Black Spot projects reduce the number of crashes causing death and injury by 30 per cent.
The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics is part of the Policy and Research Division of the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities.
The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) ranks airlines according to level of on time departures based on data compiled from 2013 to 2014.
The statistics, released today by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics, show business-class fares at their cheapest levels - when adjusted for inflation - since records began in October 1992.
A total of 1291 people died in road crashes across the country, in 2011, 424 fewer than in 2002, according to a report released by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics.
The number of road deaths in the year from Feb 2010 to Jan 2011 was 1,329, a fall of 11.5 percent from the previous year, according to the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics.
BITRE (Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics), 2008, Public Road-Related Expenditure and Revenue in Australia (2008 Update), Information Sheet 27, Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.
The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) has found that, on average, Black Spot projects reduce fatal and injury crashes by 30 per cent, so every dollar we invest in safer roads helps to change lives and save lives.
The report, Heavy truck safety: crash analysis and trends, issued by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE), examined road crashes that involved heavy trucks and compared figures against crashes involving light vehicles.
Full browser ?