CERHR

AcronymDefinition
CERHRCenter for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction
References in periodicals archive ?
(104) The 2008 report from the NTP's Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) on the potential human reproductive and developmental effects of bisphenol A, a ubiquitous chemical found in many plastics, was confirmed by the NTP's finding of "some concern for effects on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland in fetuses, infants, and children at current human exposures to bisphenol A." (105) This example demonstrates that the chemicals that can have deleterious effects on the developing brain are not just the typical smokestack pollutants, but also common chemicals that are found in children's toys, in the food that we eat, and even in household furniture and appliances.
The Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) selected this compound for evaluation because of its high volume of production, widespread human exposure, evidence of reproductive toxicity in animal studies, and public interest and concern.
CERHR Chemical Status Reports, including access to all Reports from this expert panel, are available online at http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/chemicals/.
Fabricant attended the meeting where the CERHR panel made their final decision.
Lingering doubts about the phthalate's toxicity, after so many studies, "seems to speak to the fact that somehow the right studies weren't being conducted," observes CERHR director Michael D.
Available at http:// cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/chemicals/bisphenol/bisphenol.pdf.
In 2008, the NTP published a monograph by the Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) on bisphenol A, expressing some concern over adverse effects on the brain, behavior, and prostate glands in fetuses, infants, and children (NTP 2008).
In 1998, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the NIEHS established the Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction, known as CERHR. The center served until 2010 as a clearinghouse for scientific information on environmental agents that could affect human reproduction and development.
In September 2008, the NTP completed a review of available research on BPA and concluded that there was "some concern for effects on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland in fetuses, infants, and children at current human exposures." The NTP report also recognized the existence of substantial uncertainties, stating that "Overall, the current literature cannot yet be fully interpreted for biological or experimental consistency or for relevance to human health" [NTP-Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) 2008].
Around the same time, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) convened an expert panel to examine BPA research related to human reproduction and development.
Available: cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/evals/bisphenol/BPAFinalEPVF112607.pdf [accessed 19 January 2012].