CLARK


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Related to CLARK: Clark Gable, Clark University
AcronymDefinition
CLARKCombat Launch And Recovery Kit
References in classic literature ?
 "O, he's all right," said Clark, lightly; "he's an inveterate
 "Yes," interposed Clark, "that animal has the best nose in
Clark, "that a man so given to prayer, of such a blameless example, holy in deed and thought, so far as mortal judgment may pronounce; is it fitting that a father in the church should leave a shadow on his memory, that may seem to blacken a life so pure?
Clark bent forward to reveal the mystery of so many years.
As soon as General Clark, then at the Falls of the Ohio, who was ever our ready friend, and merits the love and gratitude of all his country-men, understood the circumstances of this unfortunate action, he ordered an expedition, with all possible haste, to pursue the savages, which was so expeditiously effected, that we overtook them within two miles of their towns, and probably might have obtained a great victory, had not two of their number met us about two hundred poles before we come up.
Finding the great king beyond the water disappointed in his expectations, and conscious of the importance of the Long Knife, and their own wretchedness, some of the nations immediately desired peace; to which, at present, they seem universally disposed, and are sending ambassadors to General Clark, at the Falls of the Ohio, with the minutes of their Councils, a specimen of which, in the minutes of the Piankashaw Council, is subjoined.
South Clark Street and heaven have something in common, then," suggested Sinclair.
One night there was given a ball, the "benefit" of "One-eyed Larry," a lame man who played the violin in one of the big "high-class" houses of prostitution on Clark Street, and was a wag and a popular character on the "Levee.
Did the thing, I am still wondering; Set up how or when, By what selectmen, Gourgas or Lee, Clark or Darby?
Here were the gold mullets of the Pakingtons, the sable and ermine of the Mackworths, the scarlet bars of the Wakes, the gold and blue of the Grosvenors, the cinque-foils of the Cliftons, the annulets of the Musgraves, the silver pinions of the Beauchamps, the crosses of the Molineaux, the bloody chevron of the Woodhouses, the red and silver of the Worsleys, the swords of the Clarks, the boars'-heads of the Lucies, the crescents of the Boyntons, and the wolf and dagger of the Lipscombs.
If we were to agree with Clark that, "as humanists, we don't need to invoke reason or science to justify our preferences for a democratic, tolerant, and caring society," we'd find ourselves no better grounded than others whose imperatives are rooted in whim, ignorant fear, and dogma.
Clark said he took her cell phone and some of her clothes as ``mementos'' though he denied raping the girl, saying only that he placed his genitals against hers, O'Quinn testified.