COLREGS

AcronymDefinition
COLREGSCollision Regulations (aka NAVRULES)
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that the equation on the maneuvering board was followed by the rules of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS), commentaries to them, and recommendations on so-called "good seamanship." Finally, the values of the input vector and the value corresponding to that one made with the maneuvering board for changing the operator ship course were recorded in a learning sample.
What is more, the manoeuvre should fulfil a number of configurable conditions imposed by either COLREGS or a navigator.
In unambiguous terms, the court found that Chinese actions had violated rules 2,6,7,8,15, and 16 of the COLREGS, thus breaching article 94 of UNCLOS.
* Metrics (Real-time Autonomy COLREGS Evaluator [RACE])
The COLREGS and the International Maritime Organization III.
5 of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) states, "Every vessel shall at all times maintain a proper lookout by sight and hearing as well as by all available means appropriate in the prevailing circumstances and conditions so as to make a full appraisal of the situation and of the risk of collision." The lookout requirement is worded identically in the Inland Rules.
The MOU references international treaties and agreements to which China is a party and by which the United States has urged China to abide, including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and the Collision Regulations (COLREGs) contained in the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea.
Existing agreements such as the 1972 Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGs), the multilateral Code for Unalerted Encounters at Sea (CUES), and the 1998 bilateral U.S.-Chinese Military Maritime Consultative Agreement (MMCA) provide a framework for continued engagement.
(138) Concerning safe navigation, Sea Shepherd violated UNCLOS, SUA Convention, and COLREGS.
Szlapczynski [20] improved this model by accounting for ship maneuvering characteristics, for the COLREGS (The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea) and by introducing other operational constraints (e.g., speed reduction capability).
(24) Four major international treaties are relied upon to support claims of piracy and interference with maritime navigation: the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS); Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (SUA); International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS); and the High Seas Convention.