COMON

AcronymDefinition
COMONCoalition of Michigan Organizations of Nursing
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References in periodicals archive ?
BLOCK-K = BLOC KNAVE-K = NAVE KNELL-K = NELL KNEW-K = NEW KNIGHT-K= NIGHT KNIT-K = NIT KNOT-K = NOT KNUT-K = NUT PICKS-K = PICS SACK-K = SAC SICK-K = SIC SPECKS-K = SPECS TICK-K = TIC HOLMES-L = HOMES MARSHALL-L = MARSHAL COMMON-M= COMON (surname) CANNON-N = CANON (s name) DAMN-N = DAM FINNISH-N = FINISH INN-N = IN NUNN (surname)-N = NUN CALLOUS -O = CALLUS KIPPS- P = KIPS Q...
Latin name Comon name Fish Anguilla anguilla eel Conger conger conger Gadidae rocklings Trisopterus sp.
The United States has something in comon with countries like Kuwait, The Bahamas, Qatar, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain.
M2 EQUITYBITES-February 22, 2017-ELS announces comon and preferred stock dividends of USD0.4875 per share for Q1 2017
Ye knowe that newe brome Swepeth cleane, as many mens sainge ys, And hackneyes that be comon oftymes tyred ys And so shall he be that servethe my Ladye Although he nowe have strengthe, she wyll hym tyre at Lengthe (13-16) (41) His reference to the collective authority of "many mens sainge" to bolster his claims invokes a same-sex oral community of advice and instruction regarding erotic matters.
To solve these problems, Zarzoso and Comon [33] proposed the RobustICA algorithm which has excellent blind source separation effect.
Dietary red clover (Trifolium pratense) on growth performance of comon carp (Cyprinus carpio).
(ed.), Hannah Arendt and Education: Renewing Our Comon World.
For example, in 1693 Alice Wilson, "an idle loose P[er]son & a Constant night walker" was "charged" for "Assaulting John Morrell." (47) Thirty-eight years later, Mary Benson was punished for "assaulting and stricking" Samuel Robert and "being a loose idle disorderly Woman" who was "not able to give any good account of herself or way of living." (48) Sarah Shide, another "Comon Night Walker" who was described as "loose Idle and Disorderly" was "Charged" for "Assaulting" Edward Hodges in 1762.