CORD


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AcronymDefinition
CORDCollaboration On Repair Discoveries (adult nervous system)
CORDCanadian Organization for Rare Disorders
CORDCenter for Occupational Research and Development
CORDCone-Rod Dystrophy
CORDCouncil of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors
CORDCommunity Organizing for Responsible Development
CORDCone-Rod Dystrophy, X-Linked
CORDCoordinated Operational Requirements Document
CORDCibernet Online Roaming Database
CORDCity of Refuge Development, Inc. (Amarillo, Texas)
CORDContention Resolution by Delayline (IEEE)
CORDCentral Oklahoma Ringers and Directors (handbell group)
References in classic literature ?
She places them in a labyrinth where they are condemned to walk for ever, with a bracelet on their arms and a cord round their necks, unless they meet another as miserable as themselves.
The ape lunged against the stout cord that held him.
Immediately one of the men who were waiting slipped down into the moat, tied under Grimaud's shoulders the end of a cord, and the remaining two, who held the other end, drew Grimaud to them.
He made from thin wood a large circular runner, and in front of it placed the weighty god, sending it up to the flying kite along the throbbing cord.
Upon examination I found that the cord, though small, was amply able to sustain the weight of several men.
Are they symbols--the cord and the knife of destiny?
Next, Lamai tied him securely with a sennit cord about the neck and untied the cords that bit into his legs.
He is seated on a chest, with a piece of cord in his hand, looking out idly at the sea.
This distinguished scientist has expounded his views in a book entitled "Verschwinden und Seine Theorie," which has attracted some attention, "particularly," says one writer, "among the followers of Hegel, and mathematicians who hold to the actual existence of a so- called non-Euclidean space--that is to say, of space which has more dimensions than length, breadth, and thickness--space in which it would be possible to tie a knot in an endless cord and to turn a rubber ball inside out without 'a solution of its continuity,' or in other words, without breaking or cracking it.
The cord was made in England: A rough cord, a tough cord, A cord that bowmen love; So we'll drain our jacks To the English flax And the land where the hemp was wove.
All you need do to let me know is to undo the cord holding the curtain of the 'right' gallery window, nearest to the dark closet.
Cord, in honor of the races, had put on his best clothes, a black coat buttoned up, a stiffly starched collar, which propped up his cheeks, a round black hat, and top boots.