CRESST

AcronymDefinition
CRESSTCryogenic Rare Event Search using Superconducting Thermometers
CRESSTCenter for Research and Exploration in Space Science Technology (University of Maryland)
CRESSTCenter for Research on Evaluation Standards and and Student Testing
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of the high refractive index of 2.5, it could be used as scintillators and as detectors in CRESST for dark matter research.
Others, on the edge of or outside of the CES realm, including Fred Neumann (14) at The University of Wisconsin-Madison; Dennie Palmer Wolf (15) at work in Pittsburgh on a Rockefeller Foundation funded assessment project; and Joan Herman (16) at the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST) at the University of California, Los Angeles, were adopting the term and writing about the related notions of "portfolio assessment," "sampling" of student work (Wolf), and "performance-based assessment" (Herman).
Those collaborations - DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT and CRESST - said they found dark matter with masses ranging from 7 to 12 GeV, less than the limit determined by the Brown physicists.
Nevertheless, prominent education researchers, most notably those associated with the federally funded National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST), at the University of California, Los Angeles, blamed "high stakes" for the test score inflation.
Los Angeles, National Centre for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Testing (CRESST) Stanford University.
This study was part of a larger study undertaken by the National Partnership of Quality Afterschool Learning, conducted by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST) and their partners.
In Schacter, Herl, Chung, Dennis, and O'Neil's study (1999), four computational tools were designed to support assessment of students' problem-solving performance: (1) CRESST's Java Mapper; (2) a simulated World Wide Web environment; (3) a bookmarking applet; and (4) outcome feedback.
Joan Herman, director of the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing (CRESST) at the University of California-Los Angeles, said research suggests that, by raising the stakes for students, scores will rise, though probably not by as much as might be expected.