CREY

AcronymDefinition
CREYCholesterol Reduced Egg Yolk
CREYCurrent Real Earnings Yield (finance)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fournier, S & Crey, E 1998, Stolen from our embrace, Douglas & McIntyre Ltd, Toronto.
Crey said other than seeing some mention of Bill C-246 in the media, it has not been raised as a concern.
Fournier S and Crey E (1997) Stolen From Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities.
Fournier & Crey, supra note 4; Theodore Fontaine, Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools: A Memoir (Surrey, BC: Heritage House, 2010); Bev Sellars, They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School (Vancouver: Talonbooks, 2013).
(9) In October 2009, RCMP recommended Pickton be charged with the murders of Sharon Ahraham, Stephanie Lane, Yvonne Boen, Jackie Murdock, Dawn Crey and Nancy Clark (Stevie Cameron, On the Farm: Robert William Pickton and the Tragic Story of Vancouver's Missing Women (Toronto: Alfred A Knopf, 2010) at 701-702 [Cameron, On the Farm]).
See Andrew Armitage, Comparing the Policy of aboriginal Assimilation: Australia, Canada, New Zealand (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1995); Suzanne Fournier and Ernie Crey Jr., Stolen from Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 1997).
Because such a task is overwhelming--if not impossible--Welsh starts with the search for one women, Dawn Crey, who disappeared from Vancouver's downtown East Side and whose DNA was later discovered at a mass gravesite in a farmer's field.
Her name was Dawn Crey and she had disappeared from Vancouver's Downtown Eastside three years earlier.
Journalist Suzanne Fournier and former United Native Nations President Ernie Crey (Sto:Lo) point out in their 1997 book, Stolen from Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities, that since the time of contact with Europeans, indigenous children have been separated from their families routinely as trophies, for religious conversion, and for cultural assimilation, among other reasons.
The schools were generally bifurcated in design, reflecting an alien and disorienting gender division which created a further structural disconnect between First Nations' school reality and the much more interwoven lives they led in home communities (Fournier and Crey 1997).