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"Eosimias is the earliest well-known fossil anthropoid, and it's also important because it is so primitive that it really is the only good evidence we have of what early anthropoids would have looked like," says Beard, a researcher at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.
Dawson of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh and Tao Qi and his coworkers of the Academia Sinica in Beijing.
(1990) Minerals of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History: The Hillman Hall of Minerals and Gems.
Dawson of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, who helped excavate the Chinese finds, says more Eosimias fossils were recovered in fieldwork last May.
Through the gracious assistance of Bernadette Callery at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History Library in Pittsburgh, we were recently able to obtain a scan of the previous issue, July 1891, of Mineralogist's Monthly.
Berman, a paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh and lead author of the report.
"It is now clear that any assessment of the origins of primates in the future will have to include apatemyids," said John Wible, curator of mammals at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.
The well-preserved fossil shows several characteristics of mammals, says Zhe-Xi Luo, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.
This animal was likely adept at both swimming and walking on land," said Mary Dawson, curator emeritus of Carnegie Museum of Natural History.
Nevertheless, Christopher Beard of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, and a major advocate of the out-of-Asia movement for modern mammals, greets the new research enthusiastically.
Cannibalism in dinosaurs wouldn't be surprising, says Hans-Dieter Sues, a paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.
Christopher Beard of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, who specializes in Asian primate fossils, calls the new find a "landmark discovery." It shows that ancient primate evolution proceeded with twists, rather than in a straight line, toward apes and people, he says.
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