CRBSI

(redirected from Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infection)
AcronymDefinition
CRBSICatheter-Related Blood Stream Infection
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this article, we assessed changes in catheter-related blood stream infections (BSIs) over five years across five regional and remote facilities, and its correlation to hand hygiene audit results and interventions implemented.
(2006) reported reductions in catheter-related blood stream infections through the use of low-cost changes to nursing and physician practices.
Designed by infusion nurses, DualCap reduces the human variability associated with IV care and provides healthcare facilities with an easy-to-use, cost-effective technology that can help in the fight against catheter-related blood stream infections. A patent is still pending for the device.
Peter Pronovost's 2001 checklist, designed specifically to reduce the incidence of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSIs), has shown great potential for curbing infection rates in ICUs and elsewhere.
Use of these guidelines has proven to be effective in reducing catheter-related blood stream infections within hospital-based intensive care units by 58% from 2001 to 2009.
"Our NICU team's dedication to eliminating catheter-related blood stream infections for these fragile, immune-compromised infants illustrates our mission in action."
According to Power and Morten's abstract, patients' receiving haemodialysis treatment via a central venous catheter are at high risk of acquiring catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI).
We will continue to invest in these products to help hospitals reduce catheter-related blood stream infections and catheter occlusions."
The risk of catheter-related blood stream infections did not differ between the groups (Hoffman, Weber, Samsa, & Rutala, 1992).
To the Editor: I read with interest the article by Halton and Graves on the economics of catheter-related blood stream infections (1).
This bonus property speaks to catheter-related blood stream infections. While successful synthesis of the copolymer has occurred in large industrial reactors capable of delivering tons of product, further development in conjunction with Teknor Apex is expected to yield full commercialization within two years.
Medegen, founded in 2001, also makes needleless access vanes that are designed to help reduce catheter-related blood stream infections in hospitals.