CBGT

(redirected from Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy)
AcronymDefinition
CBGTCognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy
CBGTCognitive Behavioural Group Training
References in periodicals archive ?
This study seeks to assess and compare the therapeutic process for two girls victims of sexual abuse who were treated according to the cognitive-behavioral group therapy model proposed by Habigzang et al.
There were two qualitative case studies with the objective of evaluating and comparing the cognitive-behavioral group therapy processes for girls who have been victims of sexual abuse.
After the evaluation, the girls were sent to cognitive-behavioral group therapy, following the model by Habigzang et al.
The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on quality of life related to health, depression and health anxiety of IBS patients.
The PET scans of six patients who received citalopram and six patients who received cognitive-behavioral group therapy showed similar regional cerebral blood flow when the patients were given water labeled with (15) O.
Treating anxiety in a managed care setting: A controlled comparison of medication alone versus medication plus cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Research on Social Work Practice, 9, 188-201.
Of that number, 78 suffered from at least moderate symptoms of depression and received either eight weekly sessions of supportive group therapy, eight weekly sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy, or no group sessions (with access to individual counseling if desired).
The commonly understood and widely accepted treatment of choice for sexual offenders is cognitive-behavioral group therapy. But the quantity of sex offender group treatment that is explicitly "behavioral" has become minimal in relation to that which is overwhelmingly "cognitive." Moreover, the emphasis on cognition is virtually synonymous with an emphasis on verbal communication--talking.
Group cohesion in cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social phobia.
PHILADELPHIA -- A cognitive-behavioral group therapy intervention appears as effective as light therapy for seasonal affective disorder, and the combination may be best of all, Kelly J.
Finally, patients enrolled in cognitive-behavioral group therapy also appear more likely to discontinue treatment if they have higher pretreatment hopelessness scores and are more pessimistic about symptom control (Westra, Dozois & Boardman, 2002).
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