COND-MAT

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AcronymDefinition
COND-MATCondensed Matter
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References in periodicals archive ?
Haft et al., "Giant permanent dipole moments of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures," Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol.
Balandin, "Two-dimensional phonon transport in graphene," Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, vol.
blackbody radiation and condensed matter physics [15-20,25]), not by astronomy.
As its chairman he has a seat at the EU-funded Neutron Round Table and has also been appointed to the International Committee on the Future of Neutron Sources, a sub-group of the IUPAP Commission on the Structure andDynamics of Condensed Matter.
Although the term "cold fusion" was previously associated with research in this area, the term "condensed-matter nuclear science" was chosen to emphasize the new understanding that quantum field effects--such as tunneling and coherence--in condensed matter play a decisive role in low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR), which produce anomalous energy and reactive end products.
Polarized neutrons are preferred or required for certain types of experiments in both fundamental physics and condensed matter studies.
Scientists from universities including Oxford, Cambridge and Leeds will take part in the study, which will investigate the properties of "soft condensed matter."
He said: "Shaving foam is soft, condensed matter and what we want to discover is why it loses its shape after about a day.
He covers the basic principles of statistics, the Gibbs distribution, the classical ideal gas, quantum ideal gases, condensed matter, superconductivity, fluctuations, phase transitions and critical phenomena, linear response, kinetic equations, and basics of the modern theory of many-particle systems.
Kane, "Topological insulators with inversion symmetry," Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol.
Three of these quasiparticles, the Dirac, Majorana, and Weyl fermions, were discovered in such materials, despite the fact that the latter two had long been elusive in experiments, opening the path to simulate certain predictions of quantum field theory in relatively inexpensive and small-scale experiments carried out in these "condensed matter" crystals.