CotG

(redirected from Consent of the governed)
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AcronymDefinition
CotGCrown of the Gods (gaming)
CotGConsent of the Governed (political theory)
CotGCarnival of the Godless (atheist blogspace watch)
CotGChildren of the Gods (Stargate SG-1 espisode)
CotGChampions of the Galaxy (game)
CotGCircle of the Goddess (various locations)
CotGCleanout to Grade (plumbing/piping)
CotGChildren of the Games (website)
CotGCouncil of Technical Groups (Human Factors and Ergonomics Society)
CotGCrazy Old Testament God
References in classic literature ?
That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
The authority of government, even such as I am willing to submit to -- for I will cheerfully obey those who know and can do better than I, and in many things even those who neither know nor can do so well -- is still an impure one: to be strictly just, it must have the sanction and consent of the governed. It can have no pure right over my person and property but what I concede to it.
The authority of government, even such as I am willing to submit to--for I will cheerfully obey those who know and can do better than I, and in many things even those who neither know nor can do so well--is still an impure one: to be strictly just, it must have the sanction and consent of the governed. It can have no pure right over my person and property but what I concede to it.
Even in our own country there are still philosophers who deny the principles asserted in the Declaration, as self-evident truths--who deny the natural equality and inalienable rights of man--who deny that the people are the only legitimate source of power--who deny that all just powers of government are derived from the consent of the governed. Neither your time, nor perhaps the cheerful nature of this occasion, permit me here to enter upon the examination of this anti-revolutionary theory, which arrays State sovereignty against the constituent sovereignty of the people, and distorts the Constitution of the United States into a league of friendship between confederate corporations.
Don't you tell us all, once a year, that governments derive their just power from the consent of the governed? Can't a fellow think, that hears such things?
We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed, that whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these Ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its Foundation on such Principles, and organizing its powers in such Form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
The shameful decision by five Supreme Court justices to take power into their own hands was the inevitable result of an increasing concentration of power in the hands of a few people led by the Bush family What is so profoundly disturbing about the Supreme Court's decision is that it demonstrates the continued concentration of that power will be unfettered by a belief in the principles upon which our country was founded: the rule of law in a government that derives its authority from the consent of the governed.
We hold these truths to be sell-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with CERTAIN [inherent and] inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter and abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its power in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.
"We govern with the consent of the governed and we are about to lose it," Chiles says.
Rasmussen's and Den Uyl's procedural notion of the common good as entailing pluralism enables them to introduce a procedural notion of the social contract which makes sense of the basic foundation of government in the "consent of the governed" - something that has generally eluded Aristotelian thinkers such as Adler, Veatch, and Simon, to mention a few both recent and prominent.
American reformers, whatever their cause--whether for abolition of slavery, for barring racial segregation, for advancing the rights of women--have reminded the public that "all men are created equal." Wherever people have fought against undemocratic regimes, they have argued, using Jefferson's words, that governments derive "their just powers from the consent of the governed."
But we were troubled about a system based on the consent of the governed when the governed didn't know to what they have consented."