CPI-W

(redirected from Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers)
AcronymDefinition
CPI-WConsumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Board is required to adjust annually the asset-size exemption threshold for depository institutions based on the annual percentage change in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers. The adjustment reflects changes for the twelve-month period ending in November 2000.
Other terms included the continuation of health care coverage (Postal Service pays 75 percent of costs); retention of the COLA provision, which calls for 1 cent an hour for each 0.4 point increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers; a new starting rate for new hires, set at 90 percent of the prior starting rate; a decrease in the ratio of full-time/part-time employees in large post offices, from 90 percent to 80 percent for jobs held by Postal Worker members and from 90 percent to 88 percent for jobs held by Letter Carrier members; and the stablishment of a new category of noncareer "automation/transition" employee.
For subsequent years, the Board will adjust the threshold based on the year-to-year change in the average of the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, not seasonally adjusted, for each twelve-month period ending in November, with rounding to the nearest million.
Other contract provisions include annual cost-of-living allowances in the second and third years of the contract, equal to 1 cent (capped at 20 cents per hour annually) for each 0.3-point increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers; a sixth week of vacation after 25 years of service; establishment of labor-management committees to study safety and health issues, such as concerns about equipment used by employees and the handling of hazardous materials; maintenance of strict production standards; and the right of management to use additional part-time employees.
Other terms include establishment of employee involvement programs that basically focus on production-oriented problems; continuation of the cost-of-living adjustment clause, which provides for quarterly adjustments equal to 1 cent an hour for each 0.3-point change in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers; $3 increased in the monthly pension rate for future retirees in January of 1991 and 1992, bringing the rate to $26 and $29; a $200 increase in annual retirement benefits for current pensioners in each year of the contract; and an 85-percent (previously, 100-percent) reimbursement under the preferred provider health care plan.
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