DAISS

AcronymDefinition
DAISSDigital Airborne Intercommunication & Switching System
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Survivors include six sons, Terry Williams of Springhill, Tenn., Garry Williams of Tampa, Fla., Bill Williams of Springfield, Scott Williams of Beijing, China, and Jim Cummins and Rod Cummins, both of Eugene; a daughter, Lindsey Johnson of Eugene; a brother, Howard Daiss of Lexington, Neb.; two sisters, Francis Matera of Palm Springs, Calif., and Shirley Bonser of Bertrand, Neb.; 12 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Several other researchers have found contradicting results when utilizing the POMS test as a predictor of athletic performance (Daiss, LeUnes, & Nation, 1986; Frazier, 1988; Prapavessis & Grove, 1991).
29, 1917, in Eustis, Neb., to Otto Gottlieb and Lydia Sophia Daiss Wolfe.
Rank differences have been noted, however, in such sports as rodeo, football, and swimming (Daiss, LeUnes & Nation, 1986; Meyers, Sterling & LeUnes, 1988; Nation & LeUnes, 1983; Pursley et al., 1990).
These findings are consistent with prior personality research on both traditional and nontraditional competitors (Lesser & Murphy, 1988; LeUnes, Hayward & Daiss, 1988; Mahoney, 1989; May et al., 1985; Meyers et al., 1988, 1990, 1994; Meyers, LeUnes & Bourgeois, 1996; Morgan, 1984; Nation & LeUnes, 1983).
These include studies on mood states (Meyers, Bourgeois, Murray & LeUnes, 1993; Meyers, Sterling, Bourgeois, Treadwell & LeUnes, 1994; Morgan, 1980, 1984; Morgan, O'Connor, Ellickson & Bradley, 1988; Morgan & Pollock, 1977), competitive anxiety (Martens, 1977; Starkes & Allard, 1983; Weinberg & Genuchi, 1980), motivation (Willis, 1982; Willis & Layne, 1988), locus of control (Daiss, LeUnes & Nation, 1986; Levenson, 1981; Meyers et al., 1993; Nation & LeUnes, 1983; Rotter, 1966), and personality characteristics (McGill, Hall, Ratliff & Moss, 1986; Meyers, Sterling & LeUnes, 1988; Morgan et al., 1988; Nation & LeUnes, 1983; Silva, 1984).
An extensive amount of research has been conducted in this area (Rotter, 1975; Throup & MacDonald, 1971), substantiating both validity and reliability across numerous competitive populations (Blau, 1984; Daiss et al., 1986; Levenson, 1981).
An extensive body of research exists on the psychological characteristics of elite and collegiate athletes involved in traditional sporting events (Daiss, LeUnes, & Nation, 1986; Hagberg, Mullin, Bahrke, & Limburg, 1979; Meyers, Sterling, & LeUnes, 1988; Raglin, Morgan, & Luchsinger, 1990).
Fifty-six sport-related studies from 1975 to 1988 have used the POMS with generally consistent reproducibility (LeUnes, Hayward, & Daiss, 1988).
The test has become a common mood measure in sport research (LeUnes, Hayward & Daiss, 1989).