DEALS


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AcronymDefinition
DEALSDevelopment, Expansion, and Location Solutions (Dealtek)
References in classic literature ?
"I don't want to miss that train, and you-all have done me proud, gentlemen, letting me in on this deal. I just do appreciate it without being able to express my feelings.
Still, beside, or only a little way beneath, such a picture of passing fashion, what Steele and his fellows really deal with is the least transitory aspects of life, though still merely aspects--those points in which all human nature, great or little, finds what it has in common, and directly shows itself up.
"Still, don't ruin yourself!" said Dolokhov with a side glance at Rostov as he continued to deal.
"Then," said the Hard Man to Deal With, "why are you so anxious to have your Company bet me money that it will not?"
I can't afford to give all my love and reverence to such rarities: I want a great deal of those feelings for my every-day fellow-men, especially for the few in the foreground of the great multitude, whose faces I know, whose hands I touch for whom I have to make way with kindly courtesy.
Merrylegs was a good deal put out at being "mauled about," as he said, "by a boy who knew nothing;" but toward the end of the second week he told me confidentially that he thought the boy would turn out well.
Thurston, it is necessary to deal with me in perfect sincerity.
It is, however, a truly elegant city (very superior to New York), and I have spent a great deal of time in visiting the various monuments and palaces.
I have done a vast deal of this, but I have usually been aware that the book was subtly withholding from me the best a book can give, since I was not reading it for its own sake and because I loved it, but for selfish ends of my own, and because I wished to possess myself of it for business purposes, as it were.
The difficulty arises from the fact that one does not deal with ships in a mob, but with a ship as an individual.
I have read this work with a good deal of amusement, and upon this I congratulate myself, since it is colourless and dull.
I wish there may not be a little sulkiness of temper--her poor mother had a good deal; but we must make allowances for such a child--and I do not know that her being sorry to leave her home is really against her, for, with all its faults, it was her home, and she cannot as yet understand how much she has changed for the better; but then there is moderation in all things."