D-B

(redirected from Deaf-blind)
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AcronymDefinition
D-BDeaf-Blind
D-BDavis-Bacon Act of 1931
References in periodicals archive ?
Lydia works as a learning support assistant helping deaf-blind adults take part in activities and get out and about.
Using the device, a deaf-blind person can have real time conversations in pubs and shops, with sighted friends or when conducting confidential meetings - for example with a doctor or solicitor.
The organisation estimates there are some 2,000 deaf-blind people in North Wales.
Visual thinking is a necessity by nature, except for the deaf-blind residents, who require a tactile method for all communications.
Words in My Hands: A Teacher, A Deaf-Blind Man, An Unforgettable Journey is the award-winning inspirational tale of an eighty-six year old deaf-blind pianist, who lost his senses since age forty-five, and his renewal in life through the hand-over-hand sign, as told by his sign language teacher Diane Chambers.
Deaf elderly living in the Northwestern United States now have another, better option: Chestnut Lane, a 70-apartment assisted living facility in Gresham, Oregon, a facility exclusively for the deaf and deaf-blind.
Helen Keller (1880-1968; deaf-blind girl) and her teacher Anne Sullivan.
Fifty per cent of the adult deaf-blind population have one of the Usher forms.
Staff and clients of the Helen Keller National Center for the Deaf-Blind (HKNC) personally thanked Leona Helmsley for providing funding for the Leona and Harry B.
Instead, people who are deaf-blind must seek services from programs that serve deaf people or blind people and which usually have staff who are prepared only to serve one or the other.
Princess Anne is the patron of SENSE, the association for deaf-blind people.
Deaf-blind individuals - persons from any of the previous seven groups who are legally blind 9.