DPMO

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AcronymDefinition
DPMODeputy Prime Minister's Office (UK)
DPMODefects per Million Opportunities
DPMODefects Per Million Opportunities (Six Sigma)
DPMODeployment Process Modernization Office
DPMODon't Piss Me Off
DPMODefense Prisoner of War (POW)/Missing Personnel (MP) Office (US DoD)
References in periodicals archive ?
It's not lying in the printer scheming to destroy your first-pass yield and defects per million opportunities (DPMO) numbers.
In order to achieve Six Sigma, a process must not produce more than 3.4 defects per million opportunities. In a laboratory context, this would equate to 3.4 failed QC results per million QC runs.
The table shows defects per million opportunities, and since few of us turn out a million hemoglobins a year, we have included defects per 1000.
The term, Six Sigma refers to a defect rate of 3.4 defects per million opportunities and represents a statistically high standard of quality.
The term Six Sigma is derived from the mode of a control process, which shows less than 3.4 defects per million opportunities. Six Sigma is mainly based on understanding customer needs and expectations, using the facts, data and statistical analysis and a thorough approach to managing, improving and creating new business, production and service processes.
A production facility running at a Six Sigma level is close to perfection, meaning that only 3.4 defects per million opportunities or units will be recorded.
A sigma score of six is the ultimate goal of the Six Sigma philosophy and is equivalent to a defect rate of 3.4 defects per million opportunities. In the example, the SC performed at a 2.9 sigma level over the period or analysis.
The main goals of QMS are yield rates (first pass, order, absolute); defects per million opportunities (DPMO); DPM per assembly, order, and functional area on the production floor; storing historical data for trend analysis and post-mortem root cause analysis; ensuring on-time shipments (no production stops due to rework); performing preventative and corrective actions; maintaining and ensuring conformance and compliance, and providing statistics for OEE.
Bringing the fielding process from a 0.77 Sigma rating to a 5.2 Sigma rating equates to an improvement of 88 defects per million opportunities on input errors and zero defects per million opportunities in the process capability.
Implementation of Six Sigma creates a process capable of producing only 3.4 defects per million opportunities. The Department of Defense warehousing operations offer an excellent case for assessing the potential use of Lean Six Sigma methodology.
Keeping with the site model, each factory develops its own value stream fashioned by data from on-time deliveries, labor contribution, cycle time, overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), and defects per million opportunities (DPMO).
To achieve Six Sigma, a process must not produce more than 3.4 defects per million opportunities. A Six Sigma defect is defined as anything outside of customer specifications.