DSHEA

(redirected from Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994)
AcronymDefinition
DSHEADietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (US legislation)
References in periodicals archive ?
Recognizing the many health benefits of dietary supplements, Congress enacted the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) to ensure that supplements can be marketed and sold without following the stringent requirements imposed on prescription drugs.
Melatonin Mania: Can the FDA Regulate Hormonal Dietary Supplements to Protect Consumer Interests in Light of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994? Dayton Law Review, 22 (Fall): 77-99.
The authors re-encapsulate the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) and provide an in-depth review of important legislation amending the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) passed over the last 12 years since the publication of the previous article.
The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) has not protected consumer access to nutritional supplements as Congress intended.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), dietary supplement manufacturers (and brand owners) are responsible for ensuring a dietary supplement is safe before it is marketed, FDA explains.
(47) A dietary supplement may contain a statement of nutritional support if the statement "describes the role of a nutrient or dietary ingredient intended to affect the structure or function in humans, [or] characterizes the documented mechanism by which a nutrient or dietary ingredient acts to maintain such structure or function." Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 [section] 6 (codified as amended at 21 U.S.C.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), only ingredients not marketed in the U.S.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), in order to ban a supplement, the onus is on the FDA to prove that a product presents a significant and unreasonable risk to consumers.
Food & Drug Administration's (FDA) regulation of dietary supplements under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA).
Under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (the Act), as amended by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the manufacturer bears primary responsibility for ensuring that its dietary supplement products are safe.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the legislation in which the recently finalized regulations were originally proposed, the FDA should consider all pregnancy-related conditions as potential "illnesses," added Dr.
[sections] 321(a),(ff)); FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, (Dec.