H2O

(redirected from Dihydrogen monoxide)
AcronymDefinition
H2ODihydrogen Monoxide (water)
H2OHelping to Overcome (various locations)
H2OHip-Hop Odyssey
H2OHard 2 Obtain (hip hop)
H2OHalloween: 20 Years Later (movie)
H2OHope 2 Others (ministry; various locations)
H2OHere 2 Own (Splinter Cell gaming clan)
H2OHouse to Home Ownership (Loan)
H2OHeaven 2 Others (teen center)
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2002, radio hosts in Kansas City created panic among listeners by reporting that local tap water contained high levels of dihydrogen monoxide.
1 Fears flow over dihydrogen monoxide -- aka "water"
In 1997, while completing a science fair presentation, then 14-year-old Nathan Zohner surveyed 50 people on the dangers of DHMO, or dihydrogen monoxide. The chemical is a major component of acid rain, can cause severe burns in its gaseous form and is often lethal when accidentally inhaled.
About 20 years ago, a story surfaced about a substance called "dihydrogen monoxide." This compound was a major component of acid rain, deadly if inhaled, and often found in industrial solvents and nuclear power plants.
If you guessed "water," you're ahead of scores of people who have signed petitions to ban "dihydrogen monoxide," a tongue-in-cheek name for [H.sub.2]O.
WEBSITE WARNING HAS CALIFORNIAN COUNCIL IN A SWEAT In 2004, the city council of Aliso Viejo in California found a website that listed the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide.
It's kind of like asking: Do you like dihydrogen monoxide? Well, yeah, I drink water every day.
11:00 pm Andrew Flower "Dihydrogen monoxide and its interaction with bromeliads"
Dihydrogen monoxide was thought to be such a threat to the community of Aliso Viejo that California officials considered banning foam cups after learning the chemical was used to make them.
Municipal officials in Aliso Viejo, Calif., moved to ban foam drinking cups after an alert city employee saw on the Internet that one of the main chemicals used in their production was the compound dihydrogen monoxide. In fact, while looking at one of the plethora of sites (such as www.dhmo.org) devoted to alerting the public to the chemical, the employee saw that dihydrogen monoxide a colorless, odorless compound that is found in liquid, solid, and gaseous forms--can kill when inhaled in small quantities, can cause severe tissue damage in its solid form, can cause severe burns as a gas, and is a major component of acid rain.
Municipal officials in Aliso Viejo, Calif., moved to ban foam drinking cups after an alert city employee saw on the Internet that one of the main chemicals used in their production was the compound dihydrogen monoxide. In fact, while looking at one of the plethora of sites (such as www.dhmo.org) devoted to alerting the public to the chemical, the employee saw that dihydrogen monoxide--a colorless, odorless compound that is found in liquid, solid, and gaseous forms--can kill when inhaled in small quantities, can cause severe tissue damage in its solid form, can cause severe burns as a gas, and is a major component of acid rain.
Zohner asked 50 random people if they would favor a ban on dihydrogen monoxide. After he explained that the substance can cause excessive sweating and vomiting, is part of acid rain, can cause severe burns in its gaseous form, has been found in tumors in terminal cancer patients, and that its accidental inhalation can kill you, 43 out of 50 respondents favored a ban.