DLOC

(redirected from Discount for Lack of Control)
AcronymDefinition
DLOCDocumentation Lines of Code
DLOCDiscount for Lack of Control (finance)
DLOCDisaster Loan Outreach Center
DLOCDiablo Light Opera Company (California)
DLOCDigital Library of the Caribbean
DLOCDaimler and Lanchester Owners' Club (UK)
DLOCDirected Level Of Capability
DLOCDecreased Level of Consciousness
DLOCDuty Location
DLOCDelivered Lines of Code
DLOCDivision Logistical Operation Center
DLOCDeros Lock on Control (gun mounting system)
References in periodicals archive ?
The redemption of the decedent's voting shares was valued by the same appraiser using a 15% discount for lack of control, as well as a 35% discount for lack of marketability.
An older concept but one which could fit beautifully into some of these options is the discount for lack of control or marketability, which could be carefully used to further enhance a transfer.
And, if less than 100 percent is being valued, a discount for lack of control may then be applied.
In some cases, discounts for minority interests and lack of marketability can be 25% or more (for a recent example of a large family farming operation successfully claiming a 25% discount for lack of marketability and a significant discount for lack of control, see Litchfield v Commissioner, TC Memo 2009-21).
Conversely, a minority discount, or discount for lack of control, could be applied when you are requesting the appraiser to value a non-controlling portion of the company, and the initial value is derived from comparison to controlling interests.
The magnitude of the discount for lack of control can oftentimes be anywhere from 25% to 50%.
On Form 706, the estate claimed a 33% discount for lack of control and lack of marketability.
A boundary condition for lack of control is a typical limited partner in a large public partnership, where the discount for lack of control might be, say, 35%.
Of these, the most common valuation adjustments fall into two categories: (1) discount for lack of control and (2) discount for lack of marketability.
On their federal gift tax return, each reported the value of their 50% undivided interest at a 30% discount for lack of control and lack of marketability.
The discount for lack of control (DLOC--also referred to as a minority discount) is usually quantified by comparing the trading price of shares of publicly traded, closed-end investment funds to the net asset value per share of the same funds.
One view equates fair value with "fair market value" and factors in certain reductions in determining the value of a minority ownership interest (referred to as "discounts") that are common in a fair market value analysis, most notably, a discount for lack of control and a discount for lack of marketability.