DC&P

(redirected from Disease Control and Prevention)
AcronymDefinition
DC&PDisclosure Controls and Procedures
DC&PDisease Control and Prevention
DC&PData Collection & Processing
References in periodicals archive ?
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; [dagger] University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; [double dagger] University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA; [section] Swiss Tropical Institute, Basel, Switzerland; and [pharagrah]Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy
Influenza (Flu)/Primary Changes and Updates in the 2005 Recommendations, Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, August 8, 2005.
However, on January 20 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines for the treatment that include people exposed to HIV through unsafe sex or drug use.
Information adopted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.
Florida's success (arguably the most successful effort to reduce youth tobacco use) appears to provide evidence of the benefits of comprehensive programs (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1999; Bauer, Johnson, Hopkins, Brooks, 2000).
Drug injection has been determined as the mode of exposure to HIV in 26 percent of reported AIDS cases among adolescents and adults in the United States with an additional 6 percent attributed to men who have sex with men and inject drugs (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1997, p.
The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the institutions with which the authors are affiliated.
Henry Falk serves as the Director of the Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention (CCEHIP), which is one of four coordinating centers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Expanded chlamydia screening has resulted in decreases in prevalence among women in sites monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Adolescents and young adults, including college students, are at higher risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases because many engage in high-risk behaviors (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1999; Douglas, Collins, Warren, Kann, Gold, Clayton, Ross, & Kolbe, 1997).