DBPR

(redirected from Double-Blind Peer Review)
AcronymDefinition
DBPRDepartment of Business and Professional Regulation (Florida)
DBPRDepartment of Business and Professional Regulation (Tallahassee, FL)
DBPRDisinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (US EPA)
DBPRDistribution Boulangerie Pâtisserie Restauration (French: Bakery Food Distribution)
DBPRDouble-Blind Peer Review (research verification)
DBPRMicrobiological and Disinfection By-Products Regulations
DBPRDatabase Product Request
References in periodicals archive ?
Articles go through a double-blind peer review process and are published online immediately upon acceptance, with the reviewers' names listed.
Those articles which met this criteria were then subjected to a rigorous double-blind peer review process.
Detailed information about the peer review process for research published on IOPscience, including if the article went through single or double-blind peer review, the number of revisions before publication, and if it has been checked for originality, is now available.
For this special issue, a total of nine articles successfully went through the double-blind peer review process.
IOP Publishing (IOP) has announced the expansion of its double-blind peer review programme, following a successful pilot on two of its journals.
Articles published in the journals go through the rigorous double-blind peer review and get high citation.
In cooperation with the Army Logistics University, Army Sustainment has implemented a double-blind peer review for all articles appearing in its Spectrum section.
The articles are now subject to a double-blind peer review process, an assistant editor has been appointed, and an extensive editorial board, including scholars with different areas of expertise, will be introduced in the near future.
The CPA Journal, for example, has a double-blind peer review system for technical articles in which two reviewers render an opinion on the acceptability of manuscript based upon joint standards on CPE.
The logic of double-blind peer review, given a huge submission volume and a page cap, meant cream-lifting meritocracy.