DATA

(redirected from Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000)
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DATAData Accountability and Trust Act
DATADurham Area Transit Authority (Durham, NC)
DATADesign and Technology Association (UK)
DATADrug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000
DATADrug Alcohol Traffic Awareness
DATADebt, AIDS and Trade in Africa (humanitarian organization)
DATAData Analysis and Technical Assistance (Unit; Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs)
DATAData-Aware Transport Activity (Nortel, ADC, Fujitsu, Etc)
DATADesign and Technology Academy (San Antonio, TX)
DATADebt Aid and Trade for Africa
DATADo As Time Allows
DATADefense Air Transport Administration
DATADecisions and Advanced Technology Associates, Inc.
DATADelusions of Armymen Tank-drivers and Airmen
DATADraughtsmens' and Allied Technicians Association (UK)
DATADrawings for Army Training Aids
DATADesires, Abilities, Temperament, Assets
DATADepartment of Advanced Technology Application (MMOG game)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 created the office buprenorphine prescribing program.
Another critical change in federal policy has been implementing the terms of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, allowing qualified physicians in private-practice settings to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine and buprenorphine combination products or other federally approved Schedule III/IV/V narcotics.
The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 was truly groundbreaking in allowing private-practice physicians to treat chronic opioid dependence, where qualified, in non-clinic environments.
The urgency of the question is another sign that physicians who choose to become waiver-qualified to treat patients addicted to narcotics under the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 continue to find that the demand surpasses their ability to provide care.
With the passing of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, buprenorphine (as well as other Schedule III, IV and V medications) became available to physicians to prescribe to opiate addicts.