ELTIS

AcronymDefinition
ELTISEnglish Language Teaching Institute of Symbiosis (est. 1972)
ELTISEuropean Local Transport Information Service
ELTISExtending the Lifetime of Information Systems (research project; Finland)
References in periodicals archive ?
The methodology is in the traditions of 'input-output' and 'comparative statics' interpretations of Physiocracy, as exemplified by Phillips (1955), Meek (1963), and Eltis (1975a, 1975b).
Out of two million enslaved Africans delivered to Spanish America, nearly 600,000 were shipped from other colonies, such as Brazil, Curacao, and Jamaica, rather than direct from Africa (Borucki, Eltis and Wheat, 2015, p.
by David Eltis, Frank Lewis, and Kenneth Sokoloff (New York: Cambridge Univ.
The purpose of this contract is to manage the Eltis Web portal for a period of 24 months.
of Wisconsin Press, 1969), 74; David Eltis, Economic Growth and the Ending of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (New York: Oxford Univ.
Cambridge University Press's CD-ROM (created by David Eltis, et al) provides data on thousands of individual slaving voyages.
Firstly the little direct evidence that exists, in particular for machine tools (see Bacon and Eltis (1974) and Prais (1986)), does not support the large differences in equipment lives shown in Table 2.
ANDERSON, Richard, BORUCKI, Alex, DOMINGUES DA SILVA, Daniel, ELTIS, David, LACHANCE, Paul, MISEVICH, Philip and OJO, Olatunji.
Emmer, David Geggus, Seymour Drescher, Peter Blanchard, David Eltis and Stanley L.
With one important exception considered below, my simple model bears a family resemblance to that of Walter Eltis (2000, chapter 3), in particular in its Smithian assumption that it is the psychological characteristic of 'parsimony', rather than the rate of profit, that motivates masters to accumulate (see Appendix 3).
DuBois, The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America 1638-1870 (New York: Longmans, Green, 1896), 292; Howard, American Slavers; David Eltis, Economic Growth and the Ending of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (New York: Oxford Univ.