ETIB

(redirected from Equilibrium Theory of Island Biogeography)
AcronymDefinition
ETIBEquilibrium Theory of Island Biogeography (MacArthur and Wilson)
ETIBEcole de Traducteurs et d'Interprètes de Beyrouth (French: School of Translators and Interpreters of Beirut; Beirut, Lebanon)
ETIBEuropos Tarybos Informacijos Biuras (Lithuanian: European Union Information Office; Vilnius, Lithuania)
ETIBEuropean Telecoms Intelligence Bulletin (monthly newsletter)
References in periodicals archive ?
For over four decades, MacArthur and Wilson's equilibrium theory of island biogeography (1963; 1967; henceforth, ETIB), in which the number of species on an island is determined by the rates of immigration, emigration, and extinction at equilibrium, has been the established theory for patterns of species richness in isolated communities.
This began with the equilibrium theory of island biogeography (MacArthur and Wilson 1967).
King (1988) noted the same type of relationship between the number of reptile species and island distance from the mainland in Lake Erie and attempted to interpret the results in light of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography (MacArthur and Wilson 1967).
Independent discovery of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography.
We tested the assumption of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography that population densities are independent of area by performing a meta-analysis using the linear correlation coefficient, r, as a measure of the effect of area on population density.
Contrary to the equilibrium theory of island biogeography, our results indicate that, on average, animal population densities are positively correlated with area, which suggests that density compensation may be uncommon.
The relationship between animal population density and area has been addressed explicitly by three ecological theories: the equilibrium theory of island biogeography (MacArthur and Wilson 1967), the phenomenon of density compensation (MacArthur et al.
The equilibrium theory of island biogeography makes assumptions about population size, population density, and area in order to explain species-area relationships via the area per se hypothesis (MacArthur and Wilson 1967, Simberloff 1976, Connor and McCoy 1979).
To determine whether the relationship between animal population density and area is consistent with the assumptions of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography or with the predictions of the resource concentration hypothesis, or if density compensation is common, we compiled data from the literature on animal population density in relation to area and examined these data via meta-analysis (Gurevitch et al.
To test the assumption of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography that animal population density is independent of patch area, we tested the hypothesis that the average effect size across individual species or faunas was significantly different from zero.
This result is inconsistent with the assumption of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography that animal density is independent of island area.
The overall positive correlation between population density and patch area that we observed for individual species is inconsistent with the assumption of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography that population density is independent of area.