EIAE

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AcronymDefinition
EIAEEt in Arcadia Ego
EIAEExercise Induced Arterial Endofibrosis
EIAEExternal Iliac Artery Endofibrosis (leg pain)
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References in periodicals archive ?
As in Apollo Flaying Marsyas, in Et in Arcadia Ego the shepherds are on the left, with the skull placed on a small brick platform in a comparable position, and the shepherds are gazing at it.
"Guercino's Et in Arcadia Ego and Apollo Flaying Marsyas." Studies in Iconography 11 (1987): 137-83.
PARADISE: Guercino's Et In Arcadia Ego before and after the celebs
The earliest known reference to it is a poem 'On an Emblematical Basso Relievo after a famous Picture of Nicolas Poussin, Representing Shepherds pointing to the following Inscription on a Monument in Arcadia: Et in Arcadia Ego' by Thomas Seward (father of Anna Seward, the 'Swan of Lichfield').
On the three remaining sides are bas-reliefs accompanied by lines from Horace's Odes: a mourning woman leaning against a column surmounted by a vase, Debita Spargens Lacryma Favillam ('scatter the ashes with a deserved tear'); Charon, the ferryman, in his boat, with Mercury Psychopomp, the guide of dead souls, and the deceased bidding farewell to his wife, Linquenda Tellus Et Domus Et Placens Uxor ('Earth, home and a pleasing wife are to be left behind); and finally a reverse copy of Poussin's Et in Arcadia Ego (Fig.
He actually painted two versions of 'Et in Arcadia Ego', which are each cleverly different interpretations of the Latin inscription.
The quintet of dead birds of Five More Fallen is surprisingly moving, regardless of whether this is a picture of hunting victims or a kind of et in Arcadia ego. The artist's economical hand is everywhere present; she uses the white of the paper to stand in for snow or sky, and no more than a fraction of any given sheet is covered with her feathery graphite touch.
Et in Arcadia Ego: Actes du XXVIIe congres annuel de la North American Society for Seventeenth-Century French Literature.
Poussin perfectly represented that complex atmosphere in his famous painting where shepherds decipher a tomb's inscription 'Et in Arcadia ego', uttered by an Arcadian, now dead and gone, or else by Death itself.
Yet there is a classical austerity and a feeling of foreboding that makes one think of Poussin's Et in Arcadia ego. (Long might be closer to Claude Lorrain.) The motif of the straight road stretching out before us perspectivally, suggesting the journey of life, derives from Poussin's Landscape with a Roman Road, ca.
One looks in vain here for the dark side of the idyll, the et in Arcadia ego. The children have been in control for a long time now.
The focus of Marin's discussion is the pastoral landscape of Poussin that centers on a tomb inscribed with the words Et in Arcadia ego. At the level of the painting's story, each of the scene's figures reads in the inscription the fact of his own death.